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Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:27 PM EST

FT.com has an extraordinary report about the recent settlement between Microsoft and the CCIA:

"The landmark antitrust settlement this month between Microsoft and the Computer and Communications Industry Association, one of its oldest adversaries, resulted in a $9.75m payment to the CCIA's top official, according to confidential documents seen by the FT.

"Ed Black, CCIA president and for years one of Microsoft's fiercest opponents in antitrust investigations, netted almost half the $19.75m total payment Microsoft paid the association. His payment was approved by the CCIA board, which includes Sun Microsystems, Yahoo and Oracle.

"Mr Black and Microsoft yesterday refused to comment on the details."

I'll say. They may get to say a few words tomorrow. The EU judge hearing Microsoft's legal case has called a meeting of the parties.

You'll remember Microsoft's press release announcing the deal:

"We also announced today an agreement with CCIA. Under the terms of that agreement, CCIA similarly is withdrawing from all further participation in the European Union litigation, both the interim measures case and the merits case. In addition, CCIA is withdrawing a complaint that it has pending before the European Commission regarding Windows XP. That complaint, as many of you may know, was a principal obstacle to our ability to negotiate a settlement with the European Commission this past March. We were able to reach agreement with the Commission on all of the issues in the present case that is now before the Court of First Instance, but we were not able to reach agreement on the issues in the CCIA complaint. The CCIA complaint has now been withdrawn. CCIA also agreed not to seek review by the Supreme Court of the U.S. lawsuit.

"We're also delighted to have the opportunity to join CCIA as a member and to work with CCIA on a wide variety of issues that we believe are important to the future of our industry.

In a Background Q & A at the time of the announcement that CCIA was dropping its complaint, Microsoft posted this question and answer:

Q: After fighting Microsoft so hard and for so long, how can CCIA reverse itself like this?

A: Neither CCIA nor Microsoft is retracting or changing positions taken in the past. The decisions made are practical ones based on the status and prospects of the various proceedings and the opportunity to promote common industry objectives in the future.

Maybe they'll need to rewrite it now to say the decisions were a breeze, and were made based on the status of one of the parties and the prospects of the other.

Might this be why Nokia quit the CCIA right after the settlement was announced, saying matters were not handled "in the proper way"?


  


Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black | 234 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
OT
Authored by: LocoYokel on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:42 PM EST
Put 'em here....

[ Reply to This | # ]

OT Here ... as usual
Authored by: savage on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:43 PM EST

You know the drill!

It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage, than the creation of a new system. For the initiator has the emnity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institutions and merely lukewarm defenders in those who would gain by the new ones. -- Niccolo Machiavelli, 1513

---
Savage

In the 60's everyone took acid to make the world appear wierd
today everyone takes prozak to make the world appear normal

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to Ed Black
Authored by: stevem on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:44 PM EST
Oh My!

This seems somewhat indiscreet of the parties involved.
I eagerly await the spin doctors output on this one!!!


- SteveM

[ Reply to This | # ]

  • Yep it should be good (nt)... - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 03:27 AM EST
  • Small mote on the CCIA - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:02 AM EST
    • Secrets? - Authored by: kenryan on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 11:55 AM EST
      • Good point - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 01:22 PM EST
      • Secrets? - Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, November 25 2004 @ 08:31 AM EST
This is suprising?
Authored by: LocoYokel on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:45 PM EST
Sounds pretty much like business as usual in Seattle. Payoffs and vote buying.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to Ed Black
Authored by: cricketjeff on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 09:45 PM EST
Microsoft said it would “compensate [the] CCIA for certain legal-related
expenditures it has incurred . . . and provide substantial institutional support
for new and important policy undertakings”.

Is Ed Black an old legal expense or a new policy undertaking?

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: lordshipmayhem on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:00 PM EST
<Sarcasm>Would Ed Black be any relation to Conrad Black, or just someone
who admires his methods?</Sarcasm>

To say the optics look really, really bad would be to put it mildly. I hope the
EU judge gives no quarter in this meeting he/she has called.

Ed, you've just been microsofted.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: vruz on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:02 PM EST
as the proverbial song by Roger Waters says...

"... each man has a price, Bob
and yours was pretty low..."



---
--- the vruz

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: k12linux on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:08 PM EST
My, what a stark contrast to Pam's handling of OSRM. I wonder if he suddenly
feels caught in headlights now that this was made public.

---
- SCO is trying to save a sinking ship by drilling holes in it. -- k12linux

[ Reply to This | # ]

questions
Authored by: webster on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:11 PM EST
Do you think this money had anything to do with their withdrawing their
complaints?

Is buying off your opposition by a monopoly an antitrust violation?

Who leaked this to FT?

Did the board know the whole story?

What specifically were the CCIA issues? And why is Microsoft eager to eliminate
them?

Is there someone else that can take up these issues?

How can CCIA now be considered anything but a M$ puppet now?

Which one of the questions above is rhetorical?

---
webster

[ Reply to This | # ]

  • questions - Authored by: xtifr on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:11 PM EST
  • questions - Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:18 PM EST
  • Question 2 - Authored by: fudisbad on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:45 AM EST
  • questions - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 09:48 AM EST
FRAUD!!!!
Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:34 PM EST
Ed Black sold out to Satan himself! I wish I could say what I wanted, but there
is a lady in da house.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Get a job yet
Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 10:59 PM EST

Hey PJ, did you get a job yet?

[ Reply to This | # ]

  • Get a job yet - Authored by: PJ on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 04:30 AM EST
    • Good luck - Authored by: lifewish on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 04:48 AM EST
      • Good luck - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 09:11 AM EST
    • Tip, from the recently relocated. - Authored by: sjgibbs on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 06:10 AM EST
    • Get a job yet - Authored by: tiger99 on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:24 AM EST
    • Try SCO - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 09:38 AM EST
      • Hiss, Boo - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 12:01 PM EST
    • Get a job yet - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 09:48 AM EST
It should come as no suprise...
Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:09 PM EST
If all you have is a hammer, all problems look like nails. If all you have is
money...

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: blacklight on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:12 PM EST
Ah, the look and smell of a corrupt agreement between corrupt parties: rotting,
bloated corpses couldn't smell any worse! This kind of behavior makes me glad
that I am a member of the Open Source community.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Same guy?
Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:26 PM EST
Is this the Edwin Black who brought us "OS/2 Professional", an
excellent monthly magazin a decade ago? Hope not, would be too big a shame!

[ Reply to This | # ]

  • Same guy? - Authored by: Rudisaurus on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 04:39 AM EST
    • Same guy? - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 03:12 PM EST
Monopoly Power
Authored by: webster on Tuesday, November 23 2004 @ 11:59 PM EST
M$ does not really care that this agreement has been exposed. If it eliminates
CCIA claims, it is worth it. The Monopoly is struggling for its life. If open
standards prevail over their standards, their Monopoly dies.

Most software and hardware companies are content to be locked into the Monopoly
system. They are allowed their income trickle from the Monopoly income stream.
Better a piece of a big known pie rather than an unknown pie. CCIA members that
approved this are fools. They know that the monopoly can destroy them all.
They don't realize that they certainly will if they are allowed too. Only big
governments can stand up to them. Can the EU stand up to them? Can Asia? Can
they in turn save innovation and independence in the US?

This is a deal with the Devil. Let's hope the outrage helps turn the tide.

---
webster

[ Reply to This | # ]

How much?
Authored by: Vaino Vaher on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 12:49 AM EST
If it costs USD 10M to get the complaint withdrawn, then how much have the Irish politicians pocketed for pushing software patents in the EU parliament?
And, what are they going to do with the money? There is only a limited amount of real estate in Ireland, ans being catholic they are assumed to stay on the straight and narrow.
Whiskey! They must be going to buy whiskey for their money!

[ Reply to This | # ]

why has only nokia resigned from the CCIA?
Authored by: unsubtle on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 01:48 AM EST
i ask because CCIA members apparently include OSDL and redhat

couldn't they form a new association, which could relaunch the legal claims in the EU that the CCIA has dropped? (though AIUI they couldn't appeal the settlement of the US case, because they weren't a party to it.)

having said all that ... i was just trying out some ideas, but i don't believe legal actions can prevent M$ from abusing its monopoly. it's more realistic to beat them in the market place, despite the unlevel playing field. they can't wipe out FOSS in the same ways they've wiped out proprietary competitors. they're trying to come up with some new strategies, but i suspect none of them will work:

0. FUD ok, not new, but still applicable. this won't last for long. the key is that once enough big companies (IBM and so forth) have been pushing FOSS long enough and hard enough, the FUD will stop working. we're getting there.

1. s/w patents in so far as this is just a threat: see 0. in so far as it's for real, they could do some damage (force features to be removed from programs - or just force the developers to reimplement the features differently), but the damage would be limited. they could also be hit by counter-suits. remember that the idea that FOSS is more vulnerable to patents than proprietary s/w is FUD (see 0). so, patents are nasty, but not fatal.

2. palladium: the ultimate vendor lock-in. this is the strongest threat; the only question is who should be more worried by it: M$'s competitors, or M$? palladium's implementation will be full of errors (as always), and the security consequences will be even worse than before, because this time the OS will have literally been designed to be controlled remotely and not by the customer/victim who bought the machine (whereas now, that would be merely an amusing exaggeration). linux will continue to grow before palladium arrives (official ETA is 2006, but few people believe that), so fewer corporate types will believe there's no alternative. M$'s customers are already becoming more reluctant to upgrade to the latest windows; how many will ever "upgrade" to palladium?

when there was a link to an article about plans for GPL v3, it said that thought is being given to how to counter-act strategies 1 and 2, which sounds sensible (more sensible than my rantings, anyway ...).

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: iraskygazer on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 02:49 AM EST
This topic brings out the cynic in me.

Does it look like there is a little hush money flowing into the hands of a major
opponent of MS business practices?

[ Reply to This | # ]

What's this about the Judge?
Authored by: lifewish on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:02 AM EST
I assume that a meeting of parties means getting everyone in the same room
(rather than a collision of two groups of drunk students), but what are the
implications of this? Is this business as normal or not? Why are meetings like
this called? Is this likely to be anything to do with Black's bonus?

Anyone able to help? My brain's starting to implode.

---
To err is human but, to really screw up, you need a computer.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Extraordinary story indeed
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:36 AM EST
For background, I found this short bio of Ed Black. A small cog in the corporate/government machine in Washington.

Since he is a lawyer, we should not be surprised that his opinion is for sale.

I look forward to hearing what the CCIA board and members have to say about the rationale for this "one off bonus".

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:36 AM EST
Surely this will raise all manner of hell in the court?

The court is looking for the best resolution to this case with respect to the
consumer of the European Community; not just listening to the person that
"bitches" the loudest.

Just because Microsoft is able to bribe an industry body into dropping its
claims, doesn't mean that those claims didn't have any merit in the first place.
I hope the court recongnises this fact when making it's decision.

Stephen

[ Reply to This | # ]

CyberinSecurity is still up ...
Authored by: fredricl on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:36 AM EST
The famous CyberIn security: The Cost of Monopoly report that got former @stake CTO Dan Geer fired is still up at CCIA site. Any takers for how long?

[ Reply to This | # ]

Here is a link to another article.
Authored by: micheal on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:56 AM EST
This article (second one on page)

Up Front

uses the number $12 million of which $2 million is to be used to pay Ed Black's salary.

[Amusement] Notice the date near the top of the page. This article must be more accurate because it was published a week later! (November 29, 2004)[/Amusement]

---
LeRoy -
What a wonderful day.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 06:54 AM EST
I do not know the details of antitrust law (I am not a lawyer in any case),
however, I think that the law should consider the case where the monopoly
can pay parties to get out of the case.

The usage of money obtained through illegal usage of monopoly power
should be also illegal.

A thief cannot rob a bank, and then pay everyone so they drop the case.
An abusing monopoly should be able to do that either.

Besides, if an organization brings up a case against about a monopoly, and
then withdraw, it does not mean that the case does not exist, so if the CCIA
withdraws, anybody else should be able to continue the case, even the CCIA
should be obliged to provide any research on the area.

Cheers.









[ Reply to This | # ]

Maybe Microsoft should just use eBay to save time
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:03 AM EST
Then we will finally know the answer to one of those great unponderables when bidding starts on what the price of freedom is. I used to think it was priceless...

[ Reply to This | # ]

It reeks .
Authored by: Stumbles on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:08 AM EST
Now that is timing on the part of Groklaw. I had just read about that
over at http://www.theregister.co.uk/. Money may not buy everything
but it sure can buy people and organizations.

I am somewhat stunned by the obviousness of their actions.

---
You can tune a piano but you can't tuna fish.

[ Reply to This | # ]

  • Quote from Ed Black - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:17 AM EST
    • Working link - Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:36 AM EST
from Upfront Ezine / Listening in to the Dassault-Microsoft press conference.
Authored by: phrostie on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:32 AM EST
for many years there have been reports about a Linux Version of Catia. a high
end CAD system from Dassault.
from time to time i get updates thru the grapevine and various sources.

now it seems Ms as paid Dassault 150 million USD, for nothing. Hmmmmmmmm.




http://www.upfrontezine.com/current.htm

First Mover Advantage:
The Dassault-Microsoft Agreement

Dassault Systèmes and Microsoft held a pair of press conferences last week to
announce an agreement whose terms left the media scratching their collective
heads. You can get a sense of the puzzlement from the Q&A summary posted at
our Weblog: worldcadaccess.typepad.com/blog/2004/11/the_point_being.html

Since then, we have reviewed hours and pages of press material and arrived at
this summary of what the agreement means:

This is a five-year agreement that allows Microsoft to better understand the
collaboration needs of the high-end 3D CAD and PLM market. For Dassault, it
permits input from Microsoft to make their PLM software work better on platforms
provided by Microsoft, such as dot-Net and SharePoint. It also involves a secret
sum of money.

In our opinion, the benefits to each company are:

Microsoft -- lowered resistance by Dassault customers to purchasing
Windows-based software. Like the SAP agreement, this gives Microsoft access into
areas it does yet understand.
Dassault Systèmes -- Catia, Enovia, and Delmia were developed to run on UNIX,
but have since been ported to Windows. This agreement lets Dassault figure out
how to make the software more Windows-friendly. It is our opinion that Dassault
received a cash infusion from Microsoft, perhaps in the order of US$150 million.
Both companies deny that Microsoft purchased a share of Dassault.


http://worldcadaccess.typepad.com/blog/2004/11/the_point_being.html

Nov 17, 2004
The Point Being --
Listening in to the Dassault-Microsoft press conference. As industry analysts
ask probing questions, there seems less and less to the agreement.




Q: Will Microsoft use 3DXML as a standard like Direct3D?
A: No.
.
.
.
Q: IBM must not be happy about this, being that they are Dassault's major
distributor?
A: [no response]

Q: What does this mean about Dassault software running on Unix and Linux?
A: No change.

Q: The nagging question is, Why now? Dassault and Microsoft have been working
together for ten years. There is no product announcement. MS has other business
partners, which elevates the question even more: Why now?
A: From Microsoft's perspective, customers need Dassault products to work with
Microsoft software. Maturity of XML, integration with Office Suite, and we want
to support manufacturers.
A: From Dassault's perpective, don't read too much into the timing of the
announcement. This is an evolution, we have worked together in the past, we will
work closer together in the future. 64-bit computing, Longhorn coming, shift
from Unix to Windows, shift from Unix to Linux -- we going to do this right.
That's the timing.



---
=====
phrostie
Oh I have slipped the surly bonds of DOS
and danced the skies on Linux silvered wings.
http://www.freelists.org/webpage/snafuu

[ Reply to This | # ]

An Observation
Authored by: rsteinmetz70112 on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:38 AM EST
After polishing my tinfoil hat it occurs to me that Microsoft comes out of this
pretty well. They buy an official agreement with CCIA, but that does little to
call back all of the prior statements by CCIA and other opponents. This leak
undermines CCIA's credibility while it does little damage to Microsoft.
Microsoft's opponents already have a low opinion of Microsoft yet Microsoft can
deny that they had any control over where he money went. CCIA is marginalized in
the future unless they make some serious corrections immediately.

---
Rsteinmetz

"I could be wrong now, but I don't think so."

[ Reply to This | # ]

Microsoft motive thread
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 07:48 AM EST
This acceptace of this money by the CCIA and in particular by thier CEO has tarnished their credibility for ever. Dont forget part of the deal here was that MS would join the board also.

Excellent work by MS - and cheap at the price

These are links to previous CCIA press releases. Not a lot of use individually but might possibly be of use at some point (?).

link

link

link

link

--

MadScientist

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: waltish on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:03 AM EST
So it looks like the CCIA has been embraced and extented.


It realy shows the contempt MSoft has for the world at large when its buyouts
are so brazenly obvious.

w

---
To speak the truth plainly and without fear,Is powerfull.

PS: Beware the Gestank of SCO.
PPS: SCO's argument does not withstand analysis.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Physically Ill
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:08 AM EST
is how I feel about this deal. Microsoft is once again buying the law, plain and
simple. This should not be allowed and should be cause for additional sanctions.
I hope the EU sees through this veil and takes care of business. The industry
trade groups mean nothing at this point. I supported CCIA from its inception and
have spoken about them often as somebody finally willing to stand up to
Microsoft.

I guess it's true what they say, everyone has their price. I sure hope Ed is
sleeping well, I know I am not...

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: MSangrey on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:15 AM EST
Reminds me of a old joke:

Guy to Girl: Would you go to bed with me for a million bucks?
Girl: Ummmmm...well...I don't know...Geeee...Yeah, sure, why not?
Guy: Ok. Good! Would you go to bed with me for a dollar?
Girl: WHAT!!!!! WHAT DO YOU THINK I AM!!!!!?????
Guy: We've already established what you are. We're just dickering over the
price.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Board member leaving SCO
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:15 AM EST
From SCO's website:
Thomas P. Raimondi Jr., president and CEO of MTI Technology Corp., has resigned
as a director of The SCO Group.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:39 AM EST
I wonder - why wasn't the fact that Redhat and OSDL also approved this
mentioned? Plus, Nokia leaving may have had nothing to do with this - its silly
to assume such things without proof. So is this a MS - Redhat - OSDL -Oracle
conspiracy against the people now? Come on!

[ Reply to This | # ]

Rats and Sinking Ships?
Authored by: Greebo on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 08:47 AM EST
Well, one of SCOX's Directors has legged it, effective as of today.

Thomas P. Raimondi Jr., president and CEO of MTI Technology Corp., has resigned as a director of The SCO Group.

Mr. Raimondi informed the Company that current and anticipated time constraints relating to his duties at MTI required him to discontinue his service on the Board, effective as of Nov. 24, 2004.

So, is this the start of the Exedous?

The press release goes on to say...

The SCO Group's Board of Directors, which consists of eight seats, has initiated a search for candidates to fill the vacant seat, and will seek to appoint a replacement at the 2005 annual meeting of shareholders.

It's going to be really interesting to see if SCO can fill that spot, since they still have A Job Advert for a Senior Software Engineer Open since the 13th January 2004.

Greebo

---
PJ has permission to use my posts for commercial use.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Enemies Can Be Bought
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 09:59 AM EST
Goes to prove when diplomacy fails, buy your enemy out.

Even your worst foes have a price. How unethical and
the consumers lose out in the end. Sad. Very sad.

Oh well...business as usual.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Let's be honest here...
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 10:31 AM EST
Let's be honest here...

This is not a case about Ed Black's moral character. If Microsoft offer anyone
$10Million, they would have accepted -I know I would have.

When a man see's $10million he doesn't see Microsoft, he see's his children in a
good school, this family with excellent health care, the aleviation of all
financial woe for him and his family. You tell me that you wouldn't have
accepted it?

The fact of the matter is this: Microsoft should be able to give money to anyone
they choose. The difference is that any money given should not have an impact on
any litigation surrounding them; and it certainly should not detriment the EU
anti-trust litigation against them as a result.

This is the case where Microsoft was in the wrong (and the government of the US
for letting them get away with it for so long), not the actions of one man (and
the members of the board which allowed it to happen).

[ Reply to This | # ]

PJ for head of FOSS Political arm
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 10:38 AM EST
It seems that many of the players in this conflict can be bought off for the
right price (or perhaps realizing the the "game been fixed" (a la
getting the honest judge thrown out in the DOJ case), have become pracmatic and
taken M$ handout for their own survival.) Perhaps the FOSS community needs a
political arm that's above reproach. As Nelson Mandala retired I recomment PJ
for that position.

[ Reply to This | # ]

I'm available
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 12:49 PM EST
I would like to take this opportunity to declare that for the paltry sum of $5
million I will say nothing negative about Microsoft, its business practices, its
executives and employees, and its software products for a period of one year
from the day the check is cashed.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Criminal prosecution should continue.
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 03:51 PM EST
OK, they have settled the civil case, but surely criminal
prosecution of Microsoft should continue.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Congratulations PJ
Authored by: AdamBaker on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 04:05 PM EST
You beat both The Register and ZDnet to this story.

[ Reply to This | # ]

FSFE statement: "Freedom is priceless, but has a cost!"
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:23 PM EST

FSFE has an interesting statement on the issue:

    [http://mailman.fsfeurope.org/pipermail/press-release/2004 q4/000083.html]

    FSFE: "Freedom is priceless, but has a cost!"

    "The Free Software Foundations have a 20 year history of implementing and defending freedom in the information society -- be it on a on a single user machine or at the European Court in Luxembourg -- and we are proud of the independence and integrity we have always maintained", the president of Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) Georg Greve says in view of the settlement between Microsoft and the Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA).

    As reported by the Financial Times, Microsoft bought CCIAs withdrawal from the European Court case, deserting the European Commission for payment of 20 Million US-Dollar to the CCIA, half of which were paid to CCIAs president Ed Black personally.

    "Microsoft has invested more than 2.5bn USD into buying two things from SUN, Novell and the CCIA: The immediate freedom of European companies and consumers and the capability of the European Commission to bring about future successful antitrust investigations," Greve continues. "It may briefly increase their financial assets, but at the cost of future market perspectives." Examples are home entertainment, operating systems built into cars and mobile phones.

    The Free Software Foundation Europe emphasizes that with each turn of the wheel, it will become more difficult to break the vicious cycle. Each failed antitrust ruling will give Microsoft more assets to buy parties out of future antitrust investigations. Unlike CCIA, Novell or SUN, the Free Software Foundation Europe cannot be bought and will continue to support the European Commission in the case.

    "Those who wish to see freedom of market restored should be aware that never can someone with deeper pockets divert support already given to FSFE, as it happened with the CCIA. This independence is priceless, but not without cost. The only thing that might therefore be able to stop us is lack of resources because of lack of support." Greve finishes.

    FSFE members are available for interviews and further details.

    About the Free Software Foundation Europe:

      The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is a charitable non-governmental organisation dedicated to all aspects of Free Software in Europe. Access to software determines who may participate in a digital society. Therefore the Freedoms to use, copy, modify and redistribute software - as described in the Free Software definition- allow equal participation in the information age. Creating awareness for these issues, securing Free Software politically and legally, and giving people Freedom by supporting development of Free Software are central issues of the FSFE. The FSFE was founded in 2001 as the European sister organisation of the Free Software Foundation in the United States.

      Further information on MS vs EU case: http://www.fsfeurope.org/proj ects/ms-vs-eu/

      Further information: http://www.fsfeurope.org

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Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 05:34 PM EST
Money is a good thing; however, the love of money is the root of all evil. It
is a shame how people will sell out the future generation for money.

It is the most difficult thing to teach old dogs new tricks; it is just so sad
that "once a thief always a thief" is such a true and unchangeable
saying.

There is an old African saying; "the higher the monkey climbs the more the
monkey will be exposed".

Nothing lasts forever therefore sooner or later that bully will be subdued
eventually. PJ, I sincerely hope that you are not the only decent person with
integrity on this planet.

Lets see what happens in the next few months on the other side of the Ocean.

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Eek, Pulling Back the MS Curtain, We See ... $9.5M to CCIA's Ed Black
Authored by: kamauo on Wednesday, November 24 2004 @ 06:43 PM EST


The more I consider this whole circus the more I think that some of these
parties are secretly planning to take
M$ for a ride.

The EU will not rescind unless someone pays someone, which is quite unlikely.
There is nothing that stifles progress than monopolies and anyone who does not
know this should look at IE and FireFox.

If a little kid can create a better product than the monopoly it only goes to
show that monopolies do not support innovation or progress.

Although Sun is not a monopoly they have an aristocratic attitude, which borders
on dictatorship even though their business position is slowly but surely
eroding.

I do hope that the EU does not uphold software patents because this would be a
major stumbling block to everything that is good and reasonable in this part of
the world.

Greed is a terrible disease because we do not usually feel its effect until it
is too late. This is the beginning of the slow ending of monopoly especially in
the software industry; however, the big players cannot see this because their
eyes are blinded by greed.

Check out this story:

One day a dog was crossing a river with a bone in its mouth and while on the
bridge it looked into the river and saw the reflection of the bone it was
carrying, which seemed bigger to it.

Immediately it let go of the bone that it was carrying in order to get the
bigger one in the river. Alas, the bigger bone was an illusion and that foolish
dog lost its supper.

If you try to get it all you will eventually lose it all.


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It Stinks
Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, November 25 2004 @ 08:45 PM EST
Normally when parties settle a lawsuit, they each get something out of it or
they would not settle.

In a suit where one side is really only after damages, then money alone would
settle that suit.

In a complex antitrust action with numerous issues money is not directly an
issue in the suit. Indeed I doubt CCIA even asked for money in their
challenge.

I think that Mr. Black and others at CCIA should be asked about each and every
complaint or issue they raised. They should be asked what did they win and
where did they compromise on each issue. It will become apparent that they got
nothing. They abandanoned their claims for the money. They caved in. They
permitted themselves to be bought off.

Let us hope this is apparent to the court. The court has to approve
settlements. I don't know what is going on over there but I hope the court can
do something. Who is looking out for the public interest.

Someone should step into the breach and maintain CCIA's issues.

If the judge is outraged by this, he won't let them out of the suit.

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CCIA ignored Corel takeover by MS
Authored by: Anonymous on Saturday, November 27 2004 @ 02:58 AM EST
The Corelrescue group (now ex-Corel shareholders;
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/corelinvestors2/) contacted CCIA and Ed
Black for assistance in 2003 when Microsoft was clearly manipulating the former
Linux supporter and Office suites competitor Corel to take it private using
closely associated and former MS personnel as their proxies.

Surprisingly, Ed Black had no interest in Microsoft's burying, and even grabbing
control of, one of their few remaining high-profile competitors. Even despite
the fact that CCIA had previously kept complaining specifically about Microsoft
abusing the Office Suite monopoly in unison with the Windows monopoly.

Ed Black / CCIA didn't raise his pinky finger when in 2003 Corel and their very
large portfolio of products was taken private by MS henchmen at below
bargain-bottom prices.

I guess that's America for ya. Even high-profile self-acclaimed competition
watchdogs like Ed Black are just in it to line up their own pockets. Now,
despite having totally lost his credibility he doesn't give a damn as he's going
to retire in the luxury that a cool $10 million buys him and his conscience.

[ Reply to This | # ]

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