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The insane thing: the book publishers could have prevented this | 310 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
The insane thing: the book publishers could have prevented this
Authored by: Anonymous on Saturday, June 29 2013 @ 09:02 PM EDT
This presupposes that the top managers are very intelligent as well as very
greedy...

LECanough

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

The insane thing: the book publishers could have prevented this
Authored by: Anonymous on Saturday, June 29 2013 @ 10:48 PM EDT
>Some business mind probably decided "the Braille market is
too small, don't waste the money".

The economics of Braille printing is such, that it is not a
commercially viable operation, regardless of how it gets
sliced and diced.

Taking a Bible that contains the Protestant Canon as an
example. It takes 3,300 sheets of Braille paper, for a
single copy. Paper for that single copy costs US$330. At a
standard wholesale price of US$400, the printer will barely
break even. At the local bookstore, that Bible will retail
for US$1000. The average blind person in the United States
has a gross income of less than US$1,000 per month. Blind
people in other countries earn substantially less.

Take Dan Brown's _Inferno_, as an example. Hardcover is 480
pages. That translates into 1,248 pages in Braille. Paper
alone costs US$63, with the resulting MSRP being around
US$175.00. The upper bound of US sales of that book, in
Braille format, is the number of Braille libraries in the
United States. Offhand, I don't remember how many Braille
libraries there are, but it is under 100.

All that said, there are a number of volunteer
organizations, that will produce Braille volumes, for the
cost of paper. IOW US$63 for Dan Brown's _Inferno_, or
roughly three times the price of the large print paperback
edition from Amazon, or four times the price of the
hardcover from Amazon. Or US$320 for a Protestant Bible,
which is roughly three times the cost of a good leather
bound Bible, six times the cost of a hardcover Bible, and
sixteen times the cost of a paperback Bible.

But Braille is not the only accessible format used by blind
people. There are some who use Moon. I don't have a
worksheet to calculate the price for books that use
that format. If my math is correct, the cheapest option,
using ShapeWays,is around $60 per page.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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