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Chairman Goodlatte Review of Copyright Law is very bad news... | 172 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
So, he is a PAID voice of the copyright monopolists?
Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, April 25 2013 @ 08:47 AM EDT
n/t

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

Chairman Goodlatte Review of Copyright Law is very bad news...
Authored by: Anonymous on Wednesday, May 01 2013 @ 04:57 PM EDT
The internet is cgihnang every mass media's revenue model, not just the
recording industry's. "Pinch" Sulzberger speculated that . His
response is not to fight it, but to understand the dynamics and change with it,
to keep The Times profitable. This strategy reflects wisdom and maturity.Compare
this with the recording industry cartel, whose public face is the RIAA. The
driftnet litigation tactics and obnoxious digital rights management ploys are
alienating an entire generation of new music consumers. This is not very smart.
With all due respect to Ray, attorneys are ill-equipped to define business
strategy, because they are trained to think tactically. Even if the cartel wins
every case, their business will shrink drastically because their suppliers
(recording artists) and consumers (you and I) will quit dealing with them.The
open revolt of consumers against the music cartel is well documented in many
places, including this fine blog. What is less public, but equally important, is
that talented recording artists are either shunning the major labels, :"I'd
come to the conclusion years ago that I wasn't going to make money by selling
records. And that liberates me to feel OK about people downloading stuff freely,
because I know they're just excited about music."If the companies of the
RIAA cartel want to survive, they have to transition to a business model that
attracts great recording artists, and that doesn't involve bullying consumers.
The only thing that driftnet lawsuits might accomplish is protecting their
catalogs of old recordings somewhat. But these recordings, over time, lose their
commercial viability. EMI's catalog of Rolling Stones recordings will eventually
be worth as little as their catalog. If they can't attract new artists to their
stinky business, they're screwed. And they won't attract them if they can't
offer them a good living, or if they are known for abusing the artist's fans.The
cartel should take a cue from Sulzberger. If they abandon the record stores,
abandon DRM, and focus on primary internet distribution channels, they can
remake their businesses into profit powerhouses, restore honor and ethics to
their corrupt industry, and get consumers to actually like them, while investing
far less capital than they have in manufacturing CDs or the record store supply
chain.But if the cartel lets the lawyers run their industry, their days are
numbered. And it's not a very big number, either.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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