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Which Motorola? | 336 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
Which Motorola?
Authored by: JohnF on Thursday, March 21 2013 @ 06:07 PM EDT
Hi Tom,

I agree with you, the 6800 was the better CPU when comaring
it with the 8080. The 6809 was an improvement and the 68000
was a giant leap forward. You could have a lot of fun with a
6800, and the Motorola Development board provided all that
was necessary to do quite a lot. Ah! The good old days!

regards
John F

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

Which Motorola?
Authored by: Imaginos1892 on Thursday, March 21 2013 @ 06:40 PM EDT
The 6800 was the perfect chip for learning microprocessor
architecture - simple and logical. The 6809 was by far the
best 8-bit processor ever created.

Intel always made embedded microcontrollers - funky little chips
with fancy bit-twiddling instructions for running toasters.
They didn't know diddly about general-purpose microcomputers.

When it came time to invent the 3rd-generation microprocessor,
Intel looked to the past and made a giant microcontroller.
Motorola looked to the future and built a mainframe on a chip.

Unfortunately, IBM considered the desktop computer a toy, and
wanted to ensure that it could NEVER compete with their real
mainframes. Their choice of the 8088 was in part a deliberate
effort to cripple the "PC". The 68000 would have made SOOOOO
much more sense.

Motorola always had a much better and cleaner architecture. If
they had gotten all those beellions instead of Intel, who knows
what kind of super-chips we might be using today? As it is, all
the new Intel chips' fancy 32- and 64-bit instructions are wedged
into the cracks in the hoary old 8088 8/16-bit instruction set
for "compatibility".
--------------
Mrs. Tweedy! The chickens are revolting!

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

Which Motorola?
Authored by: Stumbles on Saturday, March 23 2013 @ 11:44 AM EDT
I have to agree with you about the 6800. Back in the early 80s going through an
Air Force tech school we had the complete schematics of the Intel 8080 and the
6800. Part of the course was to bit bang the schematics of both.

Then we had to write a short assembly program to turn on some lights in a
certain order using both processors. I was always struck with the more
intelligent design of the 6800 vs the 8080 (which I disliked a whole lot).

---
You can tuna piano but you can't tune a fish.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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