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Was the danger you were in to do with killing animals for sport? | 398 comments | Create New Account
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Was the danger you were in to do with killing animals for sport?
Authored by: Ian Al on Wednesday, December 26 2012 @ 02:24 AM EST
Hunt History
Since javelina are found in so many habitats, its natural that their foods should vary. Javelina are opportunistic feeders eating flowers, fruits, nuts, berries, bulbs, and most succulent plants. Prickly pear cactus makes up the major portion of their diet.

Hunt History

Javelina were not legally designated as big game until 1929, when a season from November 1 through January 31 was authorized and a bag limit of one javelina a year was imposed. Hunter interest gradually increased, particularly among non-residents, and the javelina became an important game animal in Arizona after World War II. By 1950, hunters were purchasing nearly 10,000 javelina tags and taking more than 1,000 animals a year. In 1959, an archery javelina season was initiated, and by 1971 more than 30,000 hunters were harvesting more than 6,000 javelina a year. This pressure was deemed excessive in some game management units, and permit-only firearm hunting was instituted in 1972. To further curtail hunt pressure and better distribute hunters, permit-only HAM (handgun, archery, and muzzleloader) hunts were initiated in 1974, and archery hunting was limited to permit-only hunting in 1992. In 2006, Arizona began offering javelina permits for fall seasons as well as spring seasons.

Behavior

Javelina are herd animals with herd sizes averaging 8 to 9 animals. Territories are set up using droppings and the dorsal scent gland to mark these areas. Aggressive displays will be made to intruding javelina. Territory size varies with the productivity of the habitat, but averages about 750 acres.
Just because they eat fruit, nuts and berries does not mean they won't be a danger to humans. As with fruit, nut, berry and picnic-basket eating bears, it is best to keep out of their territories. Keeping the numbers to a level that maintains ecological balance is best done by trained and regulated marksmen employed by the State to cull the excess.

I suspect that the professional culling of javelina is not carried out with an assault rifle because of the danger of unnecessary pain and suffering of the javelina.

---
Regards
Ian Al
Software Patents: It's the disclosed functions in the patent, stupid!

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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