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Alternatives to judge voting? | 168 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
Alternatives to judge voting?
Authored by: Anonymous on Saturday, October 06 2012 @ 04:43 AM EDT

Perhaps there is no better solution, all the best solutions are equally bad in that they all have flaws in one area or another.

Proportional voting is often touted as a better election system but it suffers flaws, see "Archimedes' Revenge" by Paul Hoffman (ISBN: 978-044921750-4, previously (my copy) 0-14-012506-X or 978-014-0125606-1) which contains two interesting chapters all about it - containing some interesting implied accusations regarding the selection of the apportionment method (which itself is rather flawed, see, for example, the Alabama Paradox).

So getting back to the original point, whatever method is chosen to select Judges, it will have flaws; but as your parent says "Follow the money" - something that ought to be done when electing representatives (ie who has paid for their election campaigns and who are they really going to serve? Or to put it another way, from this side of the pond it seems that the US elections' victors are those with the best advertising bucks who then repay their financiers by pushing through laws that they want - DMCA for starters anyone? I will add that our MPs are not exactly shining examples of being totally honest in their campaign promises).

It looks [to me] that elections in the US are rather like elections in AnkhMorpork in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series of books: "one man one vote; and that one man with the one vote is the Patrician" - except in the US it's the corporations that are the one man with the one vote.

I still favour the method Paul Hoffman recommends to overcome the deficiencies of the popular STV systems of proportional representation: Approval voting - one man many votes: you vote once for each candidate that you like and the candidates with the top n votes (when n is the number of representatives required) are elected.

So to elect Judges, the relevant electorate of citizens would get a list of the judges and told to vote for whoever they liked. Then the top n voted candidates would be elected. They would not have an election campaign as such, but a government (local state or federal) published statement about them.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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