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[Poll] How Much Has Oracle's Lawsuit Against Google Damaged Its Reputation Among Developers? | 380 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
US petition could tip the scales in favour of open access publishing
Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, May 24 2012 @ 09:47 AM EDT
Detailed Guardian piece about how one petition could have the potential to change and open the currently closed landscape of walled scientific research.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

Three things I know about Oracle v. Google
Authored by: pem on Thursday, May 24 2012 @ 10:26 AM EDT
A lawyer writes about how Oracle was wronged.

Most of it is argument from authority. He's a lawyer, David Boies is the top lawyer and smarter than all the rest of us put together, and wouldn't be doing this if it weren't morally correct, etc.

Of course, he's of the opinion that software inventiveness will dry up and blow away if Oracle doesn't have its way.

He's one of those who seems to think that copyright should offer residuals forever, and he also would apparently be perfectly happy for programmers to be serfs, among other things:

[F]undamentally it seems reasonable for the owner of Java to expect to profit when others profit from Java.

After all, if all the Android technology was so easily derived from open source code, why did Google need to hire a load of Sun engineers who worked on Java?

Obviously, Google should compensate Oracle for stealing its programmer-slaves.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

The big picture
Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, May 24 2012 @ 04:17 PM EDT
Someone sees it

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

How much has Oracle's lawsuit damaged it?
Authored by: celtic_hackr on Thursday, May 24 2012 @ 09:02 PM EDT
Over 80% think that Oracle is damaged goods now. 76% will never trust it and
about 7% won't trust it in relations to Java.

Only 17% are not influenced. Oracle has really destroyed themselves in the
market.

wow.

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

[Poll] How Much Has Oracle's Lawsuit Against Google Damaged Its Reputation Among Developers?
Authored by: Anonymous on Thursday, May 24 2012 @ 09:09 PM EDT

Article link.

As I looked, the percentages were:

    75.3%, 15.63% (which could actually still be bad - "oracle hasn't changed to me"), 7.44% (specifically java related) and 1.64%
If Oracle runs the math on the percentages, they'll realize:
    A: Trusting the percentages work out to a perfectly round number, there's at least 10,000 developers (including myself) who have taken the poll.
    B: There is between 82.74% and 98.37% developer dissatisfaction with Oracle.
Talk about killing your brand name.

Of course, it doesn't mean there's that many who have taken the poll. There's lots of number combinations that could work out appearing to be a round number... additionally, rounding on the percentages could be upsetting the actual round number. Only the pollsters know how many votes have truly been received.

But if it's true 10,000+ have already voted with a percentage of 80%+ being dissatisfied with Oracle:

    Ouch!
They certainly appear to have pulled a SCOG and alienated a large swath of their customers.

RAS

[ Reply to This | Parent | # ]

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