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May 17th SCO Bankruptcy Hearing Cancelled & Tux Visits the Computer History Museum
Saturday, May 15 2010 @ 02:44 AM EDT

The bankruptcy hearing set for May 17 is cancelled, and this time they are giving us some advance notice:

05/12/2010 - 1120 - Notice of Adjournment // Notice of Hearing Cancellation Filed by Edward N. Cahn, Chapter 11 Trustee for The SCO Group, Inc., et al.. Hearing scheduled for 5/17/2010 at 04:00 PM at US Bankruptcy Court, 824 Market St., 6th Fl., Courtroom #3, Wilmington, Delaware. (Fatell, Bonnie) (Entered: 05/12/2010)

The next hearing, unless it is cancelled too, will be June 21.

I noticed some of you were impressed by the Amiga 1000 taking a little trip to court in IP Innovation v Red Hat/Novell and were wondering where to donate your older hardware if you can't keep it at home any more. Several of you mentioned the Computer History Museum in California, and as it happens, our own Steve Martin and family just visited the museum. They visited the Monterey Bay Aquarium too, which Steve tells me is "where they shot the external shots and some of the internal shots for the 'Cetacian Institute' scenes in the movie 'Star Trek IV -- The Voyage Home'. He says he always wanted to go there just for that, but "it's a really neat aquarium in its own right." Then on to the Computer History Museum, the primary reason he chose the San Francisco area for vacation. Steve tells us what happened there:
Although I was quite disappointed in that a lot of the old mainframe displays were in storage due to construction of a new wing, and so weren't available for viewing, the tour leader took pity and snuck me into a back room where a bunch of old retired IBM engineers were working to restore some old "big iron". That set my little ole heart a-pounding, so it sort of made up for the missing displays.

And of course, we did Alcatraz, Fisherman's Wharf, and Ghirardelli, as well as Lumbard Street.

And a few pics, with Tux tagging along:


Beautiful San Francisco


Lunch


On to the Aquarium


The Computer History Museum


Big Iron - the tour

Update: A reader contributes this fascinating history of GUIs on ToastyTech. I didn't know, for example, that Commodore had 3D in 1990. If anyone ever sues me for 3D, I'll keep that in mind. Of course, what matters with patents is the date of the application, not the release date, usually. By usually, I mean, if you are looking for prior art, the date you have to beat isn't the release date. On prior art, a release date for something that isn't patented might indeed be an important date. Again, prior art searching is complicated. But it certainly helps if you know the history. If you want to review prior art searching, you'll find some resources here.


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