decoration decoration
Stories

GROKLAW
When you want to know more...
decoration
For layout only
Home
Archives
Site Map
Search
About Groklaw
Awards
Legal Research
Timelines
ApplevSamsung
ApplevSamsung p.2
ArchiveExplorer
Autozone
Bilski
Cases
Cast: Lawyers
Comes v. MS
Contracts/Documents
Courts
DRM
Gordon v MS
GPL
Grokdoc
HTML How To
IPI v RH
IV v. Google
Legal Docs
Lodsys
MS Litigations
MSvB&N
News Picks
Novell v. MS
Novell-MS Deal
ODF/OOXML
OOXML Appeals
OraclevGoogle
Patents
ProjectMonterey
Psystar
Quote Database
Red Hat v SCO
Salus Book
SCEA v Hotz
SCO Appeals
SCO Bankruptcy
SCO Financials
SCO Overview
SCO v IBM
SCO v Novell
SCO:Soup2Nuts
SCOsource
Sean Daly
Software Patents
Switch to Linux
Transcripts
Unix Books
Your contributions keep Groklaw going.
To donate to Groklaw 2.0:

Groklaw Gear

Click here to send an email to the editor of this weblog.


To read comments to this article, go here
Interview with Margaret Boribon of Copiepresse About Google.be, by Sean Daly - Updated
Wednesday, October 11 2006 @ 10:28 AM EDT

Groklaw's Sean Daly had an opportunity to interview Margaret Boribon of Copiepresse in Belgium about the recent litigation against Google.be. We present the interview in both English and French. It was conducted in French, and the translation was sent to Mme. Boribon, for her approval. Here is the Ogg audio, if you prefer to listen.

As you are aware, recently Copiepresse in Belgium sued Google for copyright infringement on behalf of the authors it represents regarding Google News using headlines and a sentence or so of their material, and on September 5th in an action in which Google had not yet appeared for reasons that are not yet proven to my satisfaction, since we have not yet heard from Google on this point, the court issued an order finding Google guilty. Here's the order [PDF], in French first and then in English. If you don't like PDFs, you can find it here in English text and another more comprehensive English version is here. Now Belgian photographers have joined the class action. And the original editors are not yet satisfied. One thing that is bothering them is cache. Apparently they do not accept robot.txt files as a solution.

[Update: 4:30 AM EDT Thurs. - Now Copiepresse is reported to be threatening MSN. The article, in French, says Microsoft is being more cooperative than Google. Also, Pressbanking, which markets Belgian articles, has asked to join Copiepresse in its action. They say they've been harmed by cache, which freely makes available materials they sell. The article has one funny bit. Even if you don't read French, you'll catch it. Look for the name of the multimedia group that has joined Copiepress:

La Sofam (droits d'auteur des photographes), la SAJ (droits d'auteur de nombreux journalistes) et la Scam (droits d'auteur du multimédia) avaient déjà rejoint Copiepresse. Un jugement sur le fond est attendu le 24 novembre. Une information du journal « L'Echo ».

Not everything translates well. Finally, here's a US case where Google's cache was found to be legal, because it was deemed fair use, and because there is an easy opt-out mechanism the plaintiff chose not to use, among other reasons. Here's the ruling [PDF], in which the judge wrote that the plaintiff “attempted to manufacture a claim for copyright infringement against Google in hopes of making money from Google’s standard [caching] practice”.]

To understand the issues, you may find it helpful to read this article, in which The World Association of Newspapers discusses its unhappiness with search engines. The organization announced in January it would launch an offensive against search engines, mentioning Google by name and indicating an interest in receiving money for Google News' using their articles.

Google did not appear in the action prior to the order issuing, but now has decided to fight first in a preliminary appeal, which was unsuccessful. There will be a full hearing on November 24.

The court relied upon an expert, Luc Golvers, who is president of CLUSIB, Club de la Sécurité informatique belge. The court ruled, based on his expert report:

Considering that his research has led him to prove that, while an article is still online on the site of the Belgian publisher, Google redirects directly, via the underlying hyperlinks, to the page where the article can be found, but as soon as the article can no longer be seen on the site of the Belgian newspaper publisher, it is possible to obtain the contents of it via the “Cached” hyperlink which then goes back to the contents of the article that Google has registered in the “cached” memory of the gigantic data base which Google keeps within its enormous number of servers;...

Considering, finally, that it is deducted from the expert’s report that:

- the way in which the Google News presently operates cause the publishers of the daily press to lose control of their web sites and their contents (of the tests conducted by the expert which show the effects of the withdrawal of an article, pages 42 to 67 of the report);

You can see a picture of Golvers in an article highlighting him on the subject of security on Microsoft's website in Belgium, coincidentally enough.

A Brief Robots.txt Tutorial

Here are the instructions for being removed from Google's search engine. Please notice that you have the following choices:

Remove your entire website
Remove part of your website
Remove snippets
Remove cached pages
Remove an outdated link
Remove an image from Google Image Search
Remove a blog from Blog Search
Remove a RSS or Atom feed (i.e., block Feedfetcher)
Remove transcoded pages

So, if a site doesn't wish its material to be found in search engines' cache, here's all it has to do. Place the following in the header of the HTML of the page or pages it doesn't want cached:

META NAME="ROBOTS" CONTENT="NOARCHIVE"

The next time Google crawls the site, it will honor that instruction. (You need to put the words inside of left and right arrows, but if I do that here, you won't be able to see the words, which is the purpose of the arrows. It's instructions for robots, not for people to read.) If you can't wait for the next time Google stops by, there's an automatic URL removal system.

If you wish not to appear in Google at all, here's all you have to do --create a file that says the following:

User-agent: * Disallow: /

Put it on your root server in one place. You don't even have to put it on every page. In fact that would confuse the bots. It looks for a robots.txt file on every site. Groklaw's, for example, would be found at http://www.groklaw.net/robots.txt. Here are simple instructions.

You can tell the search engine, all search engines, it can't index your content. You can even tell only Google, while letting in MSN or Yahoo or all other search engines. Instead of the User-agent: * say User-agent: Googlebot, if that is your wish.

Because Google's crawler checks for robot.txt first, before crawling a site, that, to me, looks like it is seeking permission. Because if the robot.txt file tells it not to scoop up content, or to extract only certain content, it will obey. So sites need not lose control of their content. If one's goal is money, then robot.txt does not solve one's problem. And it's important to point out that this isn't Google's personal invention or private system. It's a web standard, a specification that webmasters have followed since 1994.

Regarding the issue of jurisdiction, while in the interview she asserts world jurisdiction for Belgian courts, I think that is unlikely to be upheld. Ask yourself this: if any country's courts can assert jurisdiction over Google because it can be accessed over the Internet, and content must be removed that is accessible not only on the regional version of Google but on all of Google, that would mean that China could assert world jurisdiction, and so could Iran and Africa and South America, anywhere. How could any business manage to exist with everyone able to tell it how to run its business and how would it comply with conflicting laws in various places? Jurisdiction is a concept that stands for an orderliness in the law, that you ought to be able to predict where you can be sued, so you can plan your activities with clarity, and that there should be no undue encroachment. Here's an article that explains it. Anyway, France already tried that with Yahoo, and what it got was limited to the French site. Any other resolution threatens not only Google but the Internet itself. Granted that the Internet raised new issues regarding jurisdiction, but the fundamental idea of jurisdiction is fairness. That's why if I do something in New York City that would be against the law in Belgium but not here, they can't normally arrest me, unless there is a treaty in effect that says it can. How would you like it if they could? Would you like to be subject to all the laws of the entire world simultaneously?

However, there are other issues, outside of the litigation, that Mme. Boribon raises that are not as easily answered. I think you will find the interview of interest and I thank her very much for the opportunity to hear her side of the debate. Google was offered the opportunity to comment but declined to do so.

*********************************

September 28th, 2006, 12:00PM Interview
Copiepresse offices, Brussels, Belgium
Interviewer: Sean Daly

00:00

Q: I am here with Margaret Boribon of Copiepresse, Brussels. First of all, I would like to thank you for taking the time to sit down with us. To start off with, could you describe what Copiepresse does, which publications are part of it, what's the organization?

00:21

MB: Copiepresse is a rights-management society for the publishers of the French- and German-language daily press, so we include all the press titles of the Belgian daily French and German newspapers in this organization which has as its primary function to manage reproduction rights via the Reprobel body in Belgium where we represent the daily press, and which also has the mandate of its members to take up court cases whenever their rights are violated, and in addition we are currently putting in place a common platform for managing digital rights of these publishers.

01:09

Q: OK. Common for Belgium.

01:12

MB: Yes. And internationally, as well.

01:13

Q: Ah, internationally, too?

01:14

MB: Yes. Truly the one-stop shop for Belgian press digital rights.

01:22

Q: OK, and that represents roughly how many titles?

01:25

MB: Fifteen titles.

01:26

Q: Fifteen titles. OK. Let's talk about Google a bit, it's today's subject. In the United States, in other countries as well, in general, Google is respected, even admired. They have a motto, "Do no evil". But I believe that you would not agree, that you find that they do evil, could you -- before we get into the details -- could you tell me what is the essence of your point of view concerning Google ?

02:00

MB: Well -- chronologically, let's look at things. Google has existed for several years as a search engine and we never had any problems with Google until the day they created Google News, presenting themselves as an information portal, which was a totally different role compared to their initial role as a search engine. So when this service appeared in Belgium, we made known our viewpoint that for us, there were copyright violations, that they hadn't asked for the proper authorization to be able to use the content, but we have to admit that for Google, the daily French-language Belgian press probably doesn't represent much of anything and so there was really -- they literally ignored us. They hadn't, let's say, accepted the negotiations which we were proposing, and so we indicated that we would go to court. They still didn't react, so we went to court. Since the month of March of this year, the procedure is underway, we asked the judge within the framework of seizure-descriptions to designate an expert (Luc GOLVERS of the Free University of Brussels, president of the CLUSIB, NDLR) to clearly establish what Google's actions were, technically speaking how they deal with taking content, storage, forwarding, links, etc., so all that was described by the expert in a report giving full details which was submitted at the beginning of July. And so, in Belgian law, from that moment on we had one month to act upon the cessation. So even though it was the summer, well, the law is there, so we had to go ahead anyway, we filed the cessation action at the beginning of August, we sent the notification to the United States the classic way these requests are done, and contrary to what Google claimed afterwards, they were indeed clearly informed as of August 14th that a hearing was scheduled for August 28th [29th, NDLR] in Brussels. Therefore --

04:09

Q: That's it, if understood correctly they didn't even show up at the first hearing on August 29th?

04:15

MB: No, they weren't there. So naturally, the judge made a default ruling. And in that case, the opposing party, Google therefore, has the right to oppose the ruling, which they did, they filed an opposition request within a very, very short time frame -- we were summoned the day before for the following morning, before the court again -- it was September 12th we were in court again and that was when Google obviously lied about their information, their level of information. We produced formal proofs that they had all the elements and all the time to prepare their defense, and so their requests to lift the restraining orders for non-publication of the ruling were rejected and the judge validated a calendar for exchanges of conclusions which will bring us to the date of November 24th, when we will have a full hearing of arguments on the substance of the case.

05:19

Q: That's it. Which will be at the Court of First Instance?

05:21

MB: yes, the same court. It's the same court.

05:23

Q: OK. And in fact, I didn't check, but does Google have a subsidiary here in Belgium?

05:31

MB: In fact, they do have a company in Belgium, but it is a sales entity only. Therefore, there is no connection to the contents of the site. They are there to sell advertising only.

05:44

Q: Understood. So, in fact, for legal proceedings, it really is necessary to communicate with the headquarters --

05:47

MB: With the headquarters. There was no other choice. They have at this point, obviously, a law firm working on the case and so, there it is, there is an agreed-upon calendar for exchanging conclusions, and we will see on November 24th what arguments they are going to present because for the moment, we don't see any.

06:12

Q: According to my information, in fact, it was September 5th that Google was sentenced by the court to remove all links towards the press articles by September 18th at the latest, with a penalty of one million euros per day if they didn't, if this wasn't...

06:34

A. Executed.

06:35

Q: Executed, and moreover, and this is something that is often done here in Belgium, in France, in other European countries, to publish the ruling, which they had also refused to do until, I believe, Saturday morning the 23rd.

06:56

MB: What is surprising are the contradictions between the different people who speak for Google, because when the ruling -- the second ruling was handed down, Friday afternoon, journalists called me from America, from all over, telling me "Google refuses to publish the ruling". OK. And the following morning, the ruling was published. So we don't really know who speaks for them, what role they have. Is it the office in Ireland, the European office? Is it the American office? Is it the lawyer? None of that is very clear. They really give the impression of being destabilized concerning this ruling.

07:33

Q: Yes, that's true. It's not my place to speculate, but it is possible that they underestimated the importance of the Belgian procedure.

07:41

MB: Yes, quite right, that's clear. The fact they didn't come to the hearing clearly showed that they really underestimated the importance of the case, and we can say that as far as the media maelstrom which followed, we didn't expect that much. We knew that this would stir things up, but we didn't expect that it would be worldwide and would elicit so much interest from others, from other media. And it's not decreasing, I can say, it is continuing, day in, day out, there are articles, journalists who call, sites asking questions, lawyers... It's not stopping. It is truly an affair of worldwide dimensions now.

08:22

Q: There are -- I think there are subjects which need to be debated: the role of traditional media, their presence on the Internet, the availability of their content. So... well. There could be some people who have the impression that the reason for this litigation is to seek money from Google. For example, they made a deal with the Associated Press -- AP -- recently, they have litigation which has been continuing for some time with the Agence France-Presse. How would you respond to a question like that?

09:12

MB: I would respond in two stages. First, I would say we want the respect of the European legal framework, meaning prior authorization; that this authorization should involve remuneration seems completely logical, since the Google News service constitutes really a loss leader for Google and it's a way for them to generate very, very, very large revenue. So I think that from the outside, I would say, if Google was reasonable, they could understand that we have an interest in coming to an understanding, and doing a fair deal, a win-win deal, because indeed our content without a very good search engine would not be the most efficient thing on the Internet, but their search engine, if all the content producers refuse to go along, is no longer worthwhile either, or much less, in any case. So I think that there is, on their side, an intellectual effort to be made, some reflecting to do, in order to understand that their model is not acceptable for content producers who invest very heavily in what is yet an industry, the press, clearly, in the acquisition of copyrights from journalists, in quality production, in an enormous number of diverse expenditures, and that we cannot accept the loss of control over our content. However, that is exactly what is happening. From the moment your content can be found in the Google cache, you lose control over your content. They can publish it, distribute it... -- You no longer have control. The problem is really right there.

11:01

Q: The heart of the debate Let's talk about content. In my mind, in Google News, when I look at Google News, I see a title, one or two phrases, and the link. But in fact --

11:16

MB: Photos, sometimes, as well.

11:18

Q: Yes. Well, they are small, the photos.

11:20

MB: Yes, but small or large, you need to have the authorization of the copyright holder. That's how it works.

11:28

Q: And in the Google cache -- I didn't check, but is --

11:33

MB: You find the complete article.

11:35

Q: A complete article.

11:37

MB: Oh, yes, yes, quite.

11:37

Q: OK.

11:38

MB: It's really the screen capture of the article. Because we did a test where we withdrew some content, and at that moment, on Google News, we had an error message, and then when we reintroduced the article, it took more than 24 hours to reappear on Google News, and when we shift content to paid archives, we find them entirely for free in the cache. So there is really double damage. The loss of control, and the loss of revenue.

12:14

Q: OK. One could put forth the argument that the way the Internet works, if someone publishes information on the Internet, they imply permission for others to share the information, where to find it, or even to copy a little bit to orient people, etc. Don't you think that there is a risk for the public if search engines are less efficient if they can't access all the information?

12:52

MB: The goal is not that they can't access all the information. We really have to reverse [Google's way of acting with protected works]. We acted in the justice system, for cessation, because we never had a contact person to negotiate a decent agreement.

13:04

Q: OK.

13:05

MB: It's truly a consequence of Google's attitude.

13:08

Q: OK.

13:09

MB: But the objective is not that search engines stop giving access to press content. Not at all. Of course we want search engines to give access. But what's dangererous is to find yourself in a system where Google has nearly a monopoly position and sets the rules, changes the rules whenever they want and the content provider has nothing to say. He has been dispossessed of his content. He has to be pleased because that has possibly generated traffic. Possibly. But that's not the way the information society works as it is desired in Europe. In Europe, the information society must be respectful of people, creators, producers, people who provide quality content, and the legal framework is conceived with that in mind.

14:05

Q: If I understood correctly, when Google was ordered not to index nor provide links to Copiepresse publications, they did in fact do that, and in fact, worldwide, in their Google News --

14:22

MB: No.

14:23

Q: Oh no, in Google News -- ?

14:25

MB: No. In Google News dot BE, indeed, they cleaned out, they removed all the press articles. But if you type Google News dot FR, you will find articles from the Belgian press.

14:37

Q: Is that so? I did a search this morning [September 28th, NDLR], and in the Google News, Google Actualités, and so on, I didn't find -- it's true that it was a rapid search -- I didn't find articles from Belgium. On the other hand, I realized that on Google.be, I no longer found the sites, for example --

14:57

MB: No. That was a retorsion measure.

14:59

Q: I myself am a subscriber to La Libre Belgique for example and I saw that -- and this is a test I did, in fact, at the time I had read the first article in La Libre on this subject, that they were on top of a list of 200, or 2,000,000, I forget, sites found, but that -- that from Google.be, you can't find those sites any longer. However, I did the test from Google.fr and Google.com and I found them at the head of the list.

15:25

MB: Oh yes, quite right. Quite right. And at the content level, you find the content on Google.com and on Google.fr. We have a sheriff officer who notes the infringements every day. For example, concerning the publication of the ruling, they published it Saturday, Sunday they published it, Monday, then Tuesday it wasn't there.

15:48

Q: You don't say.

15:50

MB: Whereas the ruling was five days in a row. And then, it reappeared. And then -- well. We don't know very well how all that works on their side, if it's the automatic aspect which creates errors or if it's a real desire to publish, or not publish, etc., but there is especially, in my opinion, a legal mistake on their side to believe that it is sufficient to clean out Google.be or Google News dot BE. From the moment -- or from Belgium, you can access all the Internet, whether dot FR, dot com, dot whatever you want, the infringement can be noted in Belgium and so it's an illusion to say to yourself that the judge will not have jurisdiction because the content is on Google.com or Google.fr or something else.

16:42

Q: Google could advance the argument that the jurisdiction of Belgian courts applies only to their dot BE domain.

16:48

MB: But no. No. Since jurisdiction is over all infringements which are noted on its territory. And so from a computer in Belgium, you can access Google.fr, Google.com, Google dot Norway, whatever you want. Therefore, the judge is not limited in his field of competence to the dot BE site only. It's an error -- yet another error on Google's part who really, truly don't comprehend the European legal framework.

17:20

Q: I had noticed that, the first day the ruling was published on Google.be, that the text was in a frame with an elevator and that it wouldn't print correctly, and that was, improved upon let's say, the next day or two days later. It is true that, I have been using Google for a number of years, and indeed it is the first time I see a ruling published on the homepage of one of their sites.

17:50

MB: As far as we know, the only judgment against Google concerning copyrights was in the United States about photographs -- porn photos, because it was a paying site and the -- the engine -- the software -- I don't know what to call the Google system had succeeded in passing through the payment filter, and had captured the porn photographs --

18:18

Q: Yes, I recall that, it seems to me that --

18:22

MB: They were convicted.

18:24

Q: there were a number of discussions over the size of the images displayed by Google.

18:26

MB: Yes. Yes, because claiming that if it's the size of a thumbnail, it's not a real photo. When you're the photographer, that's not a language which is easily acceptable.

18:42

Q: OK then. Before, you spoke about a retorsion measure Google has taken against the member sites of Copiepresse. Has the traffic towards these sites changed as a consequence of their disappearance from Google.be ?

19:03

MB: I can say that the hypermediazation of the affair has perhaps compensated a loss of traffic coming from Google, and direct traffic towards these sites because we haven't, for the moment, a catastrophic situation.

19:21

Q: OK. You don't have the webmasters calling, saying --

19:28

MB: Yes, yes, the webmasters are not happy, because they are incentivized by click, so evidently, for them, whatever brings traffic to their sites is important, but we informed our teams, explaining that it was a battle on principles, probably a long haul, but that we weren't alone, and that's what will appear in the days and weeks to come. The other content producers, radio stations, TV, as well as the press agencies or magazines or others, will join with us in this action, and from different countries too. So at this time, it is clear that we are arm-wrestling; we are arm-wrestling Google. As long as this remains the daily Belgian newspapers, they can hope to -- to break us. From the moment there will be the French press, the German press, the Dutch press, the journalists, the authors themselves, the photographers, etc. -- that, that is likely to start a real discussion in depth and the obligation for them to call into question their economic model.

20:45

Q: Just so, following Google's sentencing, in mid-September, the World Association of Newspapers a announced a new technical initiative they call Automated Content Access Protocol ou ACAP which will facilitate spidering of media sites. For you, is that going in the same direction?

21:14

MB: Completely. Completely. The reflection we have been having, started within the WAN last year because -- before launching Google News dot BE they had already launched Google News dot FR, they had already started in other countries, so we knew that the Agence France-Presse had started proceedings. Therefore we were following these issues and the WAN really took hold of these issues, Gavin O'Reilly, the president, made a truly remarkable presentation last November and he really tried to render comprehensible to publishers the world over that it was a very, very important battle for our whole sector, that the objective was not to break Google or kill them off, but to propose an equitable partnership to them. A fair deal. And so since Google wouldn't stop saying that there were technical problems, it was difficult to ask for authorizations, etc., the WAN chose Rightscom which is a consulting firm, which has publications on the Internet also, to study this famous prior authorization platform for search engines, and for other Internet users. The problem is, it's complicated and heavy work, and it will take time to be developed, tested, etc. And moreover, even if all the steps succeed, we don't know today what it will cost publishers to implement this technology. Will it be reasonable in light of the receipts it can generate, etc. All that is a bit mysterious at the moment. The development costs today can be counted in dozens of thousands of euros, even hundreds of thousands of euros if you really want to do a full-size test. So, it is necessary, at a certain point, that there be an equitable and reasonable business model. So we totally support this step, but it will take time, and we didn't want, in failing to act, to give Google a feeling of fait accompli.

23:34

Q: OK.

23:35

MB: Because their theory has always been to say: we take, and if you don't agree, you have to contact us, and we will then remove your content. But if you enter into that logic, you admit that it's normal what they do. So we said "No". That's not how it works. It's you who has to come to us to request authorizations, and possibly pay us, or negotiate a sales agreement, which could take any form you choose; it could be sharing advertising receipts, it could be a joint-venture with a common entity -- everything is possible. Everything is possible. But it's in this sense that it should work. And since they did not respond, legal action was imperative, was necessary to say that we had indicated that we did not agree. And the advantage is, if this ruling is confirmed at the end of November, it will become European jurisprudence.

24:30

Q: Oh, as well.

24:31

MB: Oh yes. Quite possibly. Because all copyrights are regulated at the European level by the directive which applies to the 25 countries [EUCD, NDLR]. So from that moment on, the judges of all the other countries wil have this reference, this jurisprudence as reference.

24:47

Q: Do you believe that you will be systematically, necessarily before the Court, or do you think there is still time for Google to sit down at a table with you and negotiate?

25:00

MB: Of course there is time. Yes. But we haven't heard anything yet. So I don't know if they are mulling it over, or if they are blocked, or -- nothing is clear for the moment.

25:13

Q: You could say for example, if I play devil's advocate, I am with Google, I can say, well in fact, there have existed since the dawn of the Internet as we know it in the 1990s, systems for search engines, for spiders, the famous robots.txt which you can place on a site, or the metatags which allow it at page level. In addition, Google, for example, has a procedure where, upon request, a media organization can be delisted rapidly. So, in fact -- they are actually rather simple to implement, these methods, but for you, the idea is --

26:06

MB: They are not acceptable.

26:08

Q: -- This is not a way to work?

26:10

MB: This is not acceptable. No. No, no. We cannot choose between being dispossessed of our content or erased. It is not acceptable. It is not Google who can make the laws governing our content. That is not acceptable. And all the standards and techniques they use, as brilliant as they may be, are techniques which belong to them, but which have no legal value. None whatsoever. They are not standardized, they have no legal status, there is no law which says: if you are not opposed, it's normal that we take; there is no law which says that.

26:52

Q: There is no jurisprudence over their opt-out?

26:56

MB: No. Their opt-out, it's their own strategy but it has no legal basis.

27:04

Q: Finally, the robots.txt, the metatags, they are common to all search engines --

27:09

MB: That's not a reason to say that -- that they constitute a legal basis. I mean, it's just something which is technologically proven, which works well. And let me remind you what I said to you at the beginning of the interview: as long as they behaved as a search engine, we never had the slightest reproach or the slightest difficulty. It was the launching of the Google News service, presenting themselves as an information portal, which started our actions, those of the WAN, and that of the AFP. It's not the search engine we blame. It's a fabulous tool, we completely agree. Now, I would say, as a citizen, leaving aside the problems of copyrights, of my members, etc. -- as a simple citizen, I have difficulties when I find myself facing a monopoly, a near-monopoly such as this one, because the influence that can have in terms of indexing or non-indexing of information, it's not neutral -- politically, globally, it is frankly not neutral. I mean, the attitude of Google and other search engines to the Chinese government accepting censorship, or selling keywords or ad pages to the National Front... where are the ethics in all that? I want to say that I don't particularly want Google to lay down worldwide law on the Internet. That's not OK. There have to be alternatives. There has to be fair competition. There has to be respect for content and the legal frameworks of the different parts of the world. Google cannot self-proclaim itself Emperor of the Internet. It's not possible. There are major political consequences in all that.

29:09

Q: So, for you, is this Google versus the publishers, or for you, there is, with Google, really a threat in a larger sense to the availability of information, to the classification of information?

29:22

MB: Absolutely. Absolutely. That's clear. The seizure by Google of Internet search has major political consequences. Numerous lawyers have contacted us at this point saying indeed, if tomorrow Google decides that leftist publications should no longer appear, they can do that. Or no more publications in a certain language. Or no more -- they can decide the rules and the manner of classifying information, to make it appear first on the list or last... they are the masters of that. And that is nevertheless dangerous for the freedom of information, access to information... they present themselves as Robin Hood, offering everything free to the great mass of the population, they are fabulous, etc... but it's not true. They are not an NGO. This isn't -- they are not there to -- they are not a foundation. They make gigantic profits. They are listed on the stock market, they have lost a lot of money already now with this affair, their stock price has already gone down. They are not philanthropists. They are businessmen. And so, in principle, with businessmen, we should be able to find a common ground. But obviously, since their model has worked like that for a certain amount of time, it is difficult for them to question it. That much is clear. And that's why we need to create solidarity and coherence between content producers, not just the written press but radio, television, magazines and others, so there can be a common front.

31:20

Q: Madame Margaret Boribon, I thank you very much for this interview.

31:22

MB: It is I who thanks you.

31:23

Q: Have a good day, au revoir.

**********************************

September 28th, 2006, 12:00PM Interview
Copiepresse offices, Brussels, Belgium
Interviewer: Sean Daly

00:00

Q: Je suis avec Margaret Boribon de Copiepresse, Bruxelles. Tout d'abord, je souhaite vous remercier d'avoir pris le temps de s'asseoir avec nous. Pour commencer, est-ce que vous pouvez décrire ce qui fait Copiepresse, quelles publications en font partie, quelle est l'organisation?

00:21

MB: Copiepresse est une société de gestion de droits des éditeurs de la presse quotidienne francophone et germanophone, donc nous regroupons tous les titres de presse quotidienne belge francophone et germanophone dans cette organisation qui a comme fonctionne première de gérer les droits de reprographie via l'organisme Reprobel en Belgique, où nous représentons la presse quotidienne, et aussi qui a le mandat de ses membres pour agir en justice lorsque leurs droits sont violés et nous sommes en train également de mettre en place maintenant une plate-forme commune de gestion des droits numériques de ces éditeurs.

01:09

Q: D'accord. Commune pour la Belgique.

01:12

MB: Oui. Et pour l'étranger aussi.

01:13

Q: Ah, pour l'étranger aussi ?

01:14

MB: Oui. Vraiment le one-stop shop pour les droits numériques de la presse belge.

01:22

Q: D'accord, et ça représente environ combien de titres?

01:25

MB: Quinze titres.

01:26

Q: Quinze titres. D'accord. Alors on va parler un peu de Google, c'est le sujet du jour. Aux Etats-Unis, dans d'autres pays également, en général, Google est respecté, même admiré. Ils ont une maxime, "Do no evil" -- ne pas faire du mal. Mais je crois que vous ne serez pas d'accord, que vous trouvez qu'ils font du mal, est-ce que -- avant de rentrer dans un peu dans les détails -- vous pouvez me dire quel est le coeur de votre point de vue à propos de Google ?

02:00

MB: Mais -- chronologiquement, prenons les choses. Google existe depuis quelques années comme moteur de recherche et nous n'avons jamais eu de problème avec Google jusqu'au jour où Google a créé Google News en se présentant eux-mêmes comme un portail d'information, ce qui était une fonction totalement différente de la fonction de moteur de recherche initiale. Donc lorsque ce service est apparue en Belgique, nous avons fait savoir que pour nous, il y avait violation de nos droits d'auteur, qu'ils n'avaient pas demandé les mandats d'autorisation pour pouvoir réutiliser les contenus, mais il faut bien admettre que pour Google, la presse quotidienne francophone de Belgique, ça ne représente probablement pas grand-chose et donc il y a eu vraiment - ils nous ont littéralement ignorés, ils n'ont pas, disons, accepté les négociations que nous proposions et donc nous avons indiqué que nous irions en justice, ils ne sont toujours pas réagis, nous sommes allés en justice. Depuis le mois de mars de cette année, la procédure est en cours, nous avons demandé au juge dans le cadre d'une saisie-descriptions de désigner un expert (Luc GOLVERS de l'Université Libre de Bruxelles, président du CLUSIB, NDLR) pour établir réellement quelles étaient les actes posées par Google, techniquement comment se passait la prise de contenu, le stockage, le renvoi, les liens, et cetera, donc tout ça a été décrit par l'expert dans un rapport tout a fait circonstancié qui a été déposé début juillet. Et donc dans le cadre de la loi belge, nous avions à ce moment-là un mois pour agir en cessation. Donc, c'était l'été, mais, la loi est là, donc nous avons dû quand même intervenir, nous avons introduit l'action cessation début août, nous l'avons fait signifié aux Etats-Unis par la voie classique de signification de ces requêtes, et contrairement à ce que Google a prétendu par la suite, ils étaient bel et bien informé dès le 14 août qu'il y avait une audience prévu le 28 [29, NDLR] août a Bruxelles. Donc --

04:09

Q: C'est ça, j'ai cru comprendre qu'ils n'étaient même pas présent à la première audience le 29 août ?

04:15

MB: Non, ils n'étaient pas là. Donc évidemment, le juge a rendu un jugement par défaut. Et dans ce cas-là, la partie adverse, donc Google, a le droit de s'opposer à ce jugement, ce qu'ils ont fait, ils ont introduit une requête en opposition dans un délai très, très court -- nous avions été convoqué la veille pour le lendemain, de nouveau devant le tribunal, donc le 12 septembre nous nous sommes retrouvés devant la cour et c'est là que Google a menti évidemment sur son information, son niveau d'information. Nous avons produit des preuves formelles qu'ils avaient effectivement tous les éléments et tout le temps de préparer leur défense, et donc leurs requêtes sur la levée des astreintes pour non-publication du jugement ont été refusés et le juge a acté un calendrier d'échanges de conclusions qui doit nous amener a la date du 24 novembre, nous aurons l'audience complète de plaidoirie sur le fond.

05:19

Q: C'est ça. Qui sera au Tribunal de Première Instance ?

05:21

MB: Oui, la même cour. C'est la même cour.

05:23

Q: D'accord. Et en fait, je [ne] me suis pas renseigné, est-ce que Google, ils ont un bureau de représentation ici en Belgique ?

05:31

MB: En fait, ils ont une société en Belgique, mais qui est une entité commerciale uniquement. Donc, il n'y a pas de compétence sur le contenu du site, qui est là pour vendre de la publicité uniquement.

05:44

Q: Entendu. Donc, en fait, pour une procédure judiciaire, il faut bel et bien s'adresser au siège --

05:47

MB: Au siège principal, il n'y avaient pas d'autre choix. Ils ont maintenant, évidemment, un cabinet d'avocats qui traite le dossier et donc, voilà, il y a un calendrier d'échange de conclusions convenu, et on verront (sic.) le 24 novembre quels sont les arguments qu'ils vont présenter parce que pour l'instant, nous n'en voyons pas.

06:12

Q: Selon mes informations, en fait, c'était le 5 septembre que Google était condamné par la cour d'enlever tous liens vers les articles de presse, à la date limite du 18 septembre, avec un pénalité de un million d'euros par jour s'il n'était, s'il n'était pas...

06:34

A.Exécuté.

06:35

Q: Exécuté, et également, et c'est quelque chose qui se fait en Belgique ici, en France, dans d'autres pays européens, de publier le jugement, ce qu'ils ont refusé de faire aussi jusqu'à, je crois, samedi matin le 23.

06:56

MB: Ce qui est étonnant, c'est la contradiction entre les différentes personnes qui parlent au nom de Google, puisque quand le jugement -- le deuxième jugement est intervenu, le vendredi après-midi, des journalistes m'ont téléphoné d'Amérique, de partout, en me disant, Google refuse de publier le jugement. OK. Et le lendemain, le jugement a été publie. Donc on ne sait pas très bien qui parle, à quel titre, est-ce que c'est le bureau en Irlande, le bureau européen, est-ce que c'est le bureau américain, est-ce que c'est l'avocat, tout ça n'est pas très clair, ils donnent vraiment une impression de déstabilisation par rapport à ce jugement.

07:33

Q: Oui, c'est vrai. Ce ne sera pas ma place de spéculer, mais il est possible qu'ils ont sous-estimé l'importance de la procédure en Belgique.

07:41

MB: Oui, tout à fait, ça c'est clair. Le fait de ne pas venir à l'audience, c'était clairement vraiment sous-estimer l'importance du cas, et disons que le maelström médiatique qui a suivi, nous ne s'y attendait pas à ce point-là. On savait que ça ferait évidemment des remous, mais on ne s'attendait pas à ce que ça soit mondial et que ça suscite autant d'intérêt de la part des autres, des autres medias. Et ça ne décroît pas, je veux dire, ça continue, tous les jours, tous les jours, il y a des articles, des journalistes qui téléphonent, des sites qui nous posent des questions, des juristes... Ça n'arrête pas. C'est vraiment une affaire d'une ampleur mondiale maintenant.

08:22

Q: Il y a -- je crois qu'il y a quand même des sujets qui doivent être traité : le rôle des médias traditionnels, leur présence sur Internet, la disponibilité de leur contenu, et cetera. Donc... bon. Il peut y avoir des gens qui ont l'impression que la raison de ces litiges, c'est de chercher de l'argent chez Google. Par exemple, ils avait fait une affaire avec Associated Press -- AP -- récemment, ils ont une litige qui dure depuis un moment avec l'Agence France-Presse. Comment vous reprendrez à une question comme ça ?

09:12

MB: Je répondrai en deux temps. Je dirai d'abord nous voulons le respect du cadre légale européen, donc l'autorisation préalable, que cette autorisation fasse l'objet d'une rémunération nous paraît tout à fait logique, puisque le service Google News constitue vraiment un produit d'appel pour Google et que c'est une manière pour eux de générer des revenus très, très, très importants. Donc je pense que de manière extérieure, je dirai, si Google était raisonnable, ils pourrait comprendre que nous avons un intérêt à nous entendre, et à faire un fair deal, un win-win deal, parce qu'effectivement nos contenus sans un très bon moteur de recherche, c'est pas ce qui est le plus efficace sur Internet, mais leur moteur de recherche, si tous les producteurs de contenu leur oppose un refus, n'a plus d'intérêt non plus, ou beaucoup moins, en tout cas. Donc je pense qu'il y a, chez eux, un travail intellectuel a faire, une réflexion a mener, pour comprendre que leur modèle n'est pas acceptable pour les producteurs de contenu qui investissent très lourdement dans ce qui est encore une industrie, en tout cas la presse, clairement, dans l'acquisition des droits d'auteur auprès des journalistes, dans la production de qualité, dans énormément de dépenses diverses, et que donc, nous ne pouvons pas accepter de perdre le contrôle de notre contenu. Or, c'est très exactement ce qui se passe. À partir du moment où vos contenus se retrouvent sur le cache de Google, vous perdez le contrôle de ce contenu. Ils peuvent le diffuser, le distribuer... -- Vous n'avez plus le contrôle. C'est vraiment là que se situe le problème.

11:01

Q: Le coeur du débat. Si on parle de contenu. Moi, j'avais en tête, dans le Google News, quand je consulte le Google News, le titre, une ou deux phrases, et puis le lien. Mais en fait --

11:16

MB: Les photos, parfois, aussi.

11:18

Q: Oui. Enfin, ils (sic.) sont petites, les photos.

11:20

MB: Oui, mais petites ou grandes, il faut l'autorisation de l'ayant droit. C'est comme ça que ça fonctionne.

11:28

Q: Et dans le Google cache -- je ne me suis pas renseigné, mais est-ce, est-ce que --

11:33

MB: Vous trouvez l'article intégralement.

11:35

Q: Un article intégral.

11:37

MB: Ah oui, oui, tout à fait.

11:37

Q: D'accord.

11:38

MB: C'est vraiment la capture d'écran de l'article. Parce que nous avons fait le test de retirer certains contenu, et à ce moment-là sur Google News on avait un message d'erreur, et puis quand on réintroduisait l'article, ça mettait plus de 24 heures à réapparaître sur Google News, et quand nous retirons des contenus pour les mettre en archives payant, on les retrouve intégralement gratuitement sur le cache. Donc, il y a vraiment un préjudice double qui existe. La perte du contrôle, et la perte de revenue.

12:14

Q: D'accord. On peut avancer l'argument que dans le fonctionnement même de l'Internet, si quelqu'un publie des informations sur Internet, on implique une permission de permettre aux autres de partager l'information, d'où il se trouve, ou même de mettre un petit peu pour orienter les gens, et cetera. Est-ce que vous croyez qu'il n'existe pas quand même un risque pour le public si les moteurs de recherche sont moins efficaces s'ils ne peuvent pas accéder a la totalité de l'information ?

12:52

MB: Le but n'est pas qu'ils ne puissent pas accéder a la totalité de l'information. Il faut vraiment renverser [la manière d'agir de Google avec les oeuvres protégés]. Nous avons agis en justice, en cessation parce que nous n'avions pas d'interlocuteur pour négocier un accord correct.

13:04

Q: D'accord.

13:05

MB: C'est vraiment une conséquence de l'attitude de Google.

13:08

Q: D'accord.

13:09

MB: Mais l'objectif n'est pas que les moteurs de recherche ne donnent pas accès aux contenus de presse. Pas du tout. Évidemment, que nous souhaitons que les moteurs de recherche donne accès. Mais ce qui est dangereux, c'est de se retrouver dans un système où Google a quasiment une position de monopole et fixe les règles, change les règles comme ils veulent et le producteur de contenu n'a rien à dire, il est dépossédé de son contenu, il doit être très content parce que ça génère éventuellement du trafic. Eventuellement. Mais ce n'est pas le fonctionnement de la société d'information telle qu'elle est voulue en Europe. En Europe, la société d'information doit être respectueuse des gens, des créateurs, des producteurs, des gens qui fournissent ces contenus de qualité, et le cadre légal européen est conçu dans ce sens-la.

14:05

Q: Si j'ai bien compris, quand Google était ordonné de ne pas indexer et fournir des liens vers les publications de Copiepresse, ils l'ont bien fait, et en fait, au niveau mondial, dans leur Google News --

14:22

MB: Non.

14:23

Q: Ah non, dans le Google News -- ?

14:25

MB: Non. Dans Google News point BE, effectivement, ils ont nettoyé, ils ont enlevé tous les articles de presse. Mais si vous tapez Google News point FR, vous retrouvez des articles de la presse belge.

14:37

Q: Ah bon. J'ai fait une recherche ce matin [le 28 septembre, NDLR], et dans les Google News, les Google Actualités, et cetera, je ne trouvais pas -- il est vrai que c'était une recherche rapide -- je ne trouvais pas des articles de la Belgique. En revanche, je me suis rendu compte que sur Google.be, je ne trouvais plus les sites, par exemple --

14:57

MB: Non. Ça, c'était une mesure de rétorsion.

14:59

Q: Moi, je suis un abonne a La Libre Belgique par exemple et je voyais que -- et c'est un test que j'avais fait, en fait, au moment que j'avais lu la première article dans La Libre à ce sujet-la, qu'ils était en tête de liste parmi 200, ou 2,000,000, j'oublie, sites trouves, mais que -- mais ça, à partir du Google.be, on ne retrouve plus ces sites-là. Mais, j'ai fait le test depuis Google.fr et Google.com et je les trouvais bien en tête de liste.

15:25

MB: Ah oui, tout à fait. Tout à fait. Et au niveau des contenus, vous retrouvez les contenus sur Google.com et sur Google.fr. Nous avons un huissier qui tous les jours constate les infractions. Par exemple, au niveau de la publication du jugement, ils l'ont publié samedi, dimanche, ils l'ont publié lundi, puis mardi, ça n'y était pas.

15:48

Q: Dis donc.

15:50

MB: Alors que le jugement, c'était cinq jours de filée. Et puis, c'est revenu. Et puis -- bon. On ne sait bien très bien comment tout ça fonctionne chez eux, si c'est le caractère automatique qui crée des erreurs ou bien si c'est une volonté réelle de publier, ou pas publier, et cetera, mais il y a surtout, à mon avis, une erreur juridique dans leur chef de croire qu'il suffit de nettoyer Google.be ou Google News point BE. A partir du moment -- où à partir de la Belgique, on a accès à tout l'Internet, que ça soit point FR, point com, point tout ce qu'on veut, l'infraction peut être constate en Belgique et donc il est illusoire de se dire le juge ne va pas être compétent parce que le contenu se trouve sur Google.com ou Google.fr ou autre chose.

16:42

Q: Google pourrait avancer l'argument que la juridiction des cours en Belgique s'applique uniquement à leur domaine point BE.

16:48

MB: Mais non. Non. Puisque la juridiction est compétente pour les infractions qui se constatent sur son territoire. Et donc à partir d'un ordinateur en Belgique, on peut accéder à Google.fr, à Google.com, à Google point Norvège, tout ce qu'on veut. Donc, le juge n'est pas limité dans son champ de compétence au seul site point BE. C'est une erreur de la -- une erreur de plus de la part de Google qui méconnaît vraiment fortement le cadre légale européen.

17:20

Q: J'avais constaté que, le premier jour que le jugement était publié sur Google.be, que le texte était dans un cadre avec ascenseur et qu'il ne s'imprimait pas correctement, et que ça a été amélioré, disons, le lendemain ou deux jours après. Il est vrai que, je me connecte a Google depuis de nombreuses années, et c'est effectivement la première fois que je vois un jugement publié sur la une de leur site.

17:50

MB: A notre connaissance, la seule condamnation contre Google sur des droits d'auteur, c'était aux Etats-Unis par rapport à des photographes -- des photos pornographiques , parce que c'était un site payant et le -- l'engin -- le logiciel -- je ne sais pas comment on appelle le système Google avait réussi à passer à travers le filtre payant, et avaient capturé les photographies pornographiques --

18:18

Q: Oui, ça me dit quelque chose, il me semble que --

18:22

MB: Ils ont été condamnés.

18:24

Q: Il y a eu de nombreuses discussions sur la taille des images affichés par Google.

18:26

MB: Oui. Oui, parce que prétendre que si ça a la taille d'un ongle, ça ne vaut pas comme une photo. Quand vous êtes le photographe, ce n'est pas un langage qui est facilement acceptable.

18:42

Q: D'accord. Toute à l'heure, là, vous avez parlé de la mesure de rétorsion qui a pris Google envers les sites membres de Copiepresse. Est-ce que le trafic vers ces sites a changé en conséquence de leur disparition dans Google.be ?

19:03

MB: Je peux dire que l'hypermédiasation de l'affaire a peut-être compensé une perte de trafic venant de Google, et un trafic direct vers ces sites parce que on n'a pas, pour l'instant, une incidence catastrophique.

19:21

Q: D'accord. Il n'y a pas les webmasters des publications qui appellent en disant --

19:28

MB: Si, si, les webmasters ne sont pas contents, parce que ils sont incentivés par clic, donc évidemment, pour eux, tout ce qui ramène vers leurs sites, c'est important, mais on a fait une information aux équipes, en expliquant que c'était un combat de principe, probablement de longue haleine, mais que nous n'étions pas seuls, et c'est ce qui va maintenant dans les prochains jours, les prochaines semaines apparaître, c'est que les autres producteurs de contenu, les radios, TV, aussi bien que les agences de presse ou les magazines ou d'autres, vont se joindre à l'action avec nous, et venant d'autres pays. Donc a ce moment-là, c'est clair que -- on est dans un bras de fer ; on est dans un bras de fer avec Google. Tant que ça reste les journaux quotidiens belges, ils peuvent espérer nous faire -- nous casser. A partir du moment où il y aurait la presse française, la presse allemande, la presse hollandaise, les télévisions, et cetera, les journalistes, les auteurs eux-mêmes, les photographes, et cetera -- Là, ça risque de poser un vrai débat de fond et l'obligation pour eux de remettre en cause leur modèle économique.

20:45

Q: Justement, le lendemain de la condamnation de Google, au (sic.) mi-septembre, le World Association of Newspapers a annoncé une nouvelle initiative technique qui s'appelle Automated Content Access Protocol ou ACAP qui va faciliter la spiderisation, si c'est un mot -- spidering -- des sites des medias. Est-ce que pour vous, ça va dans le même sens ?

21:14

MB: Tout à fait. Tout à fait. La réflexion que nous avons mené, elle a commencé au sein de la WAN l'année dernière parce que -- avant de lancer Google News point BE ils avait déjà lancé Google News point FR, ils avaient déjà commencé dans d'autres pays, donc on savait que l'Agence France-Presse avait déjà entamé une action. Donc on suivait déjà le dossier et la WAN s'est vraiment saisie de ce dossier, Gavin O'Reilly, le président, a vraiment fait une présentation en novembre dernier tout à fait remarquable et il a essayé vraiment de faire comprendre a tous les éditeurs du monde entier que c'était un combat vraiment très, très important pour tout notre secteur, que l'objectif n'était pas de casser Google ou les tuer, mais de leur proposer un partenariat équitable. Un fair deal. Et donc comme Google n'arrêtait pas de dire qu'il y avait des problèmes techniques, que ça ne marcherait pas, que c'était difficile de demander des autorisations, et cetera, la WAN a mandaté Rightscom qui est une société de consultants, qui a des publications sur Internet aussi pour étudier cette fameuse plate-forme d'autorisation préalable pour les moteurs de recherche, mais pour d'autres utilisateurs sur Internet. Le problème, c'est que c'est un travail compliqué et lourd, et que ça va prendre du temps à être développé, testé, et cetera. Et puis, même si toutes ces étapes sont réussies, on ne sait pas aujourd'hui ce que ça coûtera aux éditeurs d'implémenter cette technologie. Est-ce que ce sera raisonnable par rapport aux recettes que ça peut générer, et cetera. Tout ça est encore un peu mystérieux pour le moment. Les coûts de développement aujourd'hui se chiffrent en dizaines de milliers d'euros, voire centaines de milliers d'euros si on veut vraiment faire un test en vrai grandeur. Donc, il faut quand même que, à un moment donné, il y ait un business model équilibré et raisonnable. Donc nous soutenons tout à fait cette démarche, mais elle va prendre du temps, et nous ne voulions pas, en n'agissant pas, donner à Google un sentiment de fait accompli.

23:34

Q: D'accord.

23:35

MB: Parce que leur théorie a toujours été de dire: on prend, si vous n'étés pas d'accord, vous devez nous contacter, et alors on retire votre contenu. Mais rentrer dans cette logique-là, c'est admettre que c'est normal ce qu'ils font. Donc nous avons dit "Non". Ce n'est pas comme ça que ça fonctionne, c'est vous qui devez venir nous demander les autorisations, et éventuellement nous rémunérer, ou trouver un accord commercial, qui peut prendre n'importe quelle forme ; ça peut être un partage de recettes publicitaires, ça peut être un joint-venture dans un entité commune -- tout est possible. Tout est possible. Mais c'est dans ce sens-là que ça doit marcher. Et comme ils n'ont pas répondu, l'action juridique était impérative, était nécessaire pour dire que nous avons clairement indiqué que nous n'étions pas d'accord. Et l'avantage c'est que, si ce jugement est confirmé fin novembre, ça devient jurisprudence européenne.

24:30

Q: Ah, en plus.

24:31

MB: Ah oui. Evidemment. Puisque tout le droit d'auteur est régulé au niveau européen dans le cadre du directive qui s'applique aux 25 pays [EUCD, NDLR]. Donc à ce moment-là, les juges de tous les autres pays auront cette référence, cette juriprudence comme référence.

24:47

Q: Est-ce que vous croyez que vous serez systématiquement devant la cour -- forcément devant la cour, ou est-ce qu'il y a encore temps pour Google de s'asseoir à une table avec vous et négocier ?

25:00

MB: Bien sûr qu'il y a le temps. Oui. Mais nous n'avons rien entendu jusqu'au présent. Alors je ne sais pas s'ils réfléchissent, ou s'ils sont bloqués, ou -- rien n'est clair pour le moment.

25:13

Q: On peut dire par exemple, si je fais l'avocat du diable, je suis chez Google, je peux dire, bien en fait, il existe depuis l'aube de l'internet tel que nous le connaissons dans les années 90, des systèmes pour les moteurs de recherche, pour les araignées, le fameux robots.txt qu'on peut mettre dans un site, ou les metatags qui permet au niveau de chaque page. De plus, Google, par exemple, ils ont une procédure où par simple demande, une organisation médiatique peut delister rapidement. Donc, en fait -- ils sont quand même simple à mettre en oeuvre, ces méthodes, mais pour vous, l'idée c'est que --

26:06

MB: Ils ne sont pas acceptables.

26:08

Q: -- ce n'est pas une façon de travailler ?

26:10

MB: Ce n'est pas acceptable. Non. Non, non. Nous ne pouvons pas choisir entre être dépossedé de notre contenu ou être effacés. Ce n'est pas acceptable. Ce n'est pas Google qui peut faire la loi sur nos contenus. Ce n'est pas acceptable. Et toutes les normes et les techniques qu'ils utilisent, aussi brillantes soient-elles, sont des techniques qui leur appartiennent, mais qui n'ont aucune valeur juridique. Aucune. C'est absolument pas standardisé, ce n'est pas reconnu légalement, il n'y a aucune loi qui dit, si vous ne vous opposez pas, c'est tout à fait normal qu'on prenne, aucune loi qui dit ça.

26:52

Q: Il n'y a pas de juriprudence sur leur opt-out ?

26:56

MB: Non. Leur opt-out qu'ils ont institué, c'est leur stratégie à eux mais qui n'est basée sur aucune base légale.

27:04

Q: Enfin, le robots.txt, les metatags, ils sont communs à tous les moteurs de recherche --

27:09

MB: Ce n'est pas une raison pour dire qu'ils sont -- qu'ils constituent une base légale. Je veux dire, c'est quelque chose de technologiquement éprouvé, qui marche bien. Et je vous rappelle ce que je vous ai dit au début de l'entretien : tant qu'ils se sont comporte en moteur de recherche, nous n'avons jamais exprimé le moindre reproche ou la moindre difficulté. C'est le lancement du service Google News où ils se présentent comme portail d'information qui a déclenché nos actions, les actions de la WAN et celle de l'AFP. Ce n'est pas le moteur de recherche que nous mettons en cause. C'est un outil formidable, on est tout à fait d'accord. Maintenant, je dirai, en tant que citoyenne, sans même parler de problématiques de droit d'auteur, de mes membres, et cetera -- en tant que simple citoyenne, j'ai quand même une difficulté quand je me retrouve face à un monopole, un quasi-monopole comme celui-là parce que l'influence que ça peut avoir en termes d'indexation de l'information ou du non-indexation de l'information, ce n'est pas neutre -- politiquement, mondialement, ce n'est pas franchement pas neutre. Je veux dire, l'attitude de Google et d'autres moteurs de recherche par rapport au gouvernement chinois qui accepte de censurer, ou qui vendent des mots-clefs ou des pages de publicité au Front National... où est l'éthique dans tout ça ? Je veux dire, moi je ne suis pas nécessairement désireuse que Google fasse la loi mondialement sur Internet. Ça ne va pas. Il faut des alternatives, il faut qu'il y ait une concurrence loyale, il faut qu'il y ait un respect des contenus et des cadres légaux des différentes parties du monde. Google ne peut pas s'autoproclamer empereur d'Internet. Ce n'est pas possible. Il y a des conséquences politiques majeures dans tout ça.

29:09

Q: Est-ce que, pour vous, c'est Google contre les éditeurs, ou est-ce que pour vous, il y a, avec Google, il y a vraiment une menace au sens large de la disponibilité d'information, de la classification de l'information ?

29:22

MB: Tout à fait. Tout à fait. Ça c'est clair. La mainmise de Google sur les recherches sur Internet a des conséquences politiques majeures. De nombreuses avocats maintenant nous ont contacté en disant effectivement, si demain Google décide plus aucune publication de gauche n'apparaît, ils peuvent le faire. Ou plus aucune publication de telle langue. Ou plus -- ils peuvent décider des règles et de la manière de hiérarchiser l'information, de la faire apparaître en première plan ou en dernier plan... Ils sont maîtres de ça. Et ça, c'est quand même dangereux par rapport a la liberté d'information, l'accès a l'information... Ils se représentent comme vraiment Robin des Bois, qui offre tout gratuitement à la grande masse de la population, ils sont formidables, et cetera... Mais ce n'est pas vrai. Ce n'est pas un ONG. Ce n'est pas -- ils ne sont pas là pour faire -- ce n'est pas une fondation. Ils font des profits gigantesques. Ils sont coté en bourse, ils ont perdu beaucoup d'argent maintenant déjà avec cette affaire, leur cotation a quand même déjà bien chuté. Ce ne sont pas des philanthropes. Ce sont des businessmen. Et donc, a priori, avec des businessmen, on devrait pouvoir trouver un terrain d'entente. Mais évidemment, comme leur modèle a fonctionné comme ça pendant un certain temps, il y a une difficulté pour eux à le remettre en cause. Ça, c'est clair. Et c'est pour ça qu'on a besoin de créer une solidarité, une cohérence entre les producteurs de contenu pas seulement de presse écrite mais de radio, de télévision, de magazine et autres, pour qu'il y est un front commun.

31:20

Q: Madame Margaret Boribon, je vous remercie beaucoup pour cet entretien.

31:22

MB: C'est moi qui vous remercie.

31:23

Q: Bonne journée, au revoir.


  View Printable Version


Groklaw © Copyright 2003-2013 Pamela Jones.
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.
Comments are owned by the individual posters.

PJ's articles are licensed under a Creative Commons License. ( Details )