decoration decoration
Stories

GROKLAW
When you want to know more...
decoration
For layout only
Home
Archives
Site Map
Search
About Groklaw
Awards
Legal Research
Timelines
ApplevSamsung
ApplevSamsung p.2
ArchiveExplorer
Autozone
Bilski
Cases
Cast: Lawyers
Comes v. MS
Contracts/Documents
Courts
DRM
Gordon v MS
GPL
Grokdoc
HTML How To
IPI v RH
IV v. Google
Legal Docs
Lodsys
MS Litigations
MSvB&N
News Picks
Novell v. MS
Novell-MS Deal
ODF/OOXML
OOXML Appeals
OraclevGoogle
Patents
ProjectMonterey
Psystar
Quote Database
Red Hat v SCO
Salus Book
SCEA v Hotz
SCO Appeals
SCO Bankruptcy
SCO Financials
SCO Overview
SCO v IBM
SCO v Novell
SCO:Soup2Nuts
SCOsource
Sean Daly
Software Patents
Switch to Linux
Transcripts
Unix Books
Your contributions keep Groklaw going.
To donate to Groklaw 2.0:

Groklaw Gear

Click here to send an email to the editor of this weblog.


To read comments to this article, go here
The Apple Appeals Court Hearing, as MP3
Sunday, June 11 2006 @ 06:27 PM EDT

Here's a real treat. Groklaw member dburns arranged for us to get the audio of the hearing before the Court of Appeal of the State of California, Sixth Appellate District Court in the case Jason O'Grady v. Apple (commonly known as Apple v. the Bloggers). The Order is here that resulted from this hearing.[UPDATE: Here it is as Ogg, as promised.]

I'm sure you'll understand why the court ruled as it did, when you hear the arguments. It's also an opportunity to witness what appeals are like. And you'll see why lawyers always tell you that you can't predict the outcome by the questions the judges ask. Here the questions when the first lawyer is speaking might give you an idea that the court intended to rule for Apple. It didn't. Note for example that one judge asks in a tone of voice that might sound negative about whether a case called Mitchell (Mitchell v. Superior Court) applied. The lawyer says, "Absolutely," and there proceeds a discussion. You'll notice in the eventual ruling, the court cited that case.

I think you'll see here also how hard it is to be a lawyer. He has to be ready to answer any question, so he has to prepare to cite cases and laws no matter what the court asks about. It's very nerve-wracking, because you get so little time to speak, you have to have it all inside your memory bank. Enjoy.


  View Printable Version


Groklaw © Copyright 2003-2013 Pamela Jones.
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.
Comments are owned by the individual posters.

PJ's articles are licensed under a Creative Commons License. ( Details )