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More Resources for the Next Phase of SCO v. IBM
Thursday, April 20 2006 @ 11:13 PM EDT

Now that we are about finished with discovery in SCO v. IBM, gasp! -- in order for you to understand the next parts, it's time to focus on things like rules for experts and the rules of evidence. So this is just a brief note to let you know that I've added such resources to Groklaw's Legal Links page. Here are the new items:

Feel free to dive in now. A lot of you have been emailing me asking questions that these resources can answer. It's fun to read the rules in the context of a particular case, as opposed to just trying to read and remember in the abstract. We'll likely be referring to these resources as we go forward. I'm looking forward to it very, very much.

For example, we have three experts now, regarding code, two for IBM and now one for SCO, although his expertise in Linux has not been established as far as I'm concerned.

I notice that his declaration attaches his bio, and his Linux credential is that his book on Unix was updated to include some material on Linux, and the book came in third, winning a 2004 Linux Journal Readers' Choice award in the most indispensible Linux book category. However, the real winner wasn't on the list: "The most popular write-in vote continued to be man pages." Here's a presentation [PDF] he gave on "What is Unix?" He has a personal definition on page 4 ("A UNIX system is an OS that implements*some version of POSIX.1 as its lowest-level (native) API") and note that in this June 2003 presentation, he lists SCO as being one of the owners of the Unix IP:

Who Owns “UNIX?”
•Open Group: 1996 merger of Open Software Foundation (OSF) and X/Open

•Owns UNIX trademark (gift from Novell)

–SCO (formerly Caldera) owns UNIX intellectual property –in the news!

•www.opengroup.org

•Jointly works with POSIX as Austin Group –www.opengroup.org/austin

So much for experts expounding outside of their area of expertise, but it does indicate rather a willingness to believe SCO pretty much from the beginning, doesn't it, unless he was joking. He does seem to have a nice sense of humor. If anyone listened to that presentation, I'd love to hear from you.

Actually, Groklaw won a Linux Journal Editors' Choice award that same year as best community website. I guess that qualifies me as an expert too, if his book winning third place in a reader poll qualifies him. After all, what's good for the goose is good for the gander. Or vice versa.

So ... here's my expert opinion: This is the stupidest lawsuit since the world began.


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