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"Most Linux Users I've Talked to Aren't Maliciously Angry at SCO"
Monday, February 02 2004 @ 09:29 PM EST

Here is a report from KSL-TV:
Collin Bunker, Westminster College Systems Engineer: "Most Linux users that Iíve talked to, or people involved in the community, arenít maliciously angry at SCO." . . .

SCO accuses Linux users of launching the virus while some Linux enthusiasts accuse SCO of stage-managing the virus-crisis. . . . Blake Stowell: "Oftentimes this community of developers chooses to sort of take the law into their own hands and do things outside the bounds of the law. And we believe this is just another instance of that happening."

Poppycock, according to Collin Bunker of Westminster College. Linux is used at the campus computer center. Bunker thinks the virus targeted SCO as a distraction and has nothing to do with Linux.

Collin Bunker/Westminster College Systems Engineer: "There's no advantage for a Linux user to do this. It's not going to make SCO step down, it's not going to make SCO retract their claims."


Meanwhile, Linux moves forward in the enterprise, which is why no matter what SCO does, it can't kill it. Too many companies and governmental agencies depend on it. Amazon is moving its data warehouse to Linux now:
Data warehousing software will be next to make the move to Linux at Amazon. The incursion of Linux is so extensive that, at this point, it is easier to identify what does not run on Linux than to enumerate what does, said Killalea, vice president of infrastructure at Amazon.com.

Killalea outlined the key steps in the company's full-scale move to Linux. In 2000, HTTP server farms made the transition. In 2001, remaining commercial app servers moved to Linux. Put another way, server load balancing was the first to go to Linux, followed by active/standby fault-tolerant clusters and then distributed message queuing systems. Beginning last year and completed early this year, DB servers are now getting the Linux treatment.

"We want low-maintenance overhead with interchangeable parts," said Killalea, who added that Amazon is endeavoring to take a new approach to the usual technology tradeoff "between fast, reliable and cheap." You usually have to pick one or two of those traits, he explained, but the effort now is to gain all three; Linux is an enabler in that effort.


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