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Virus Came From Russia, Says MessageLabs
Tuesday, January 27 2004 @ 10:22 PM EST

MessageLabs has announced that the MyDoom virus originated in Russia. That pretty much rules out any Linux enthusiast trying to get back at SCO, as far as I can see. Nobody in Russia cares about a legal case in the US that won't affect them one bit. It looks like spammers and worse trying to shift the blame to cover the other ugly things this virus does, because it tries to install a keylogger to get your credit card and other such details, according to Symantec, something no Linux person has ever been involved in to the best of my knowledge.

Here are the details from MessageLabs:

The worm was first intercepted by MessageLabs on the 26th January, 2004 at 8:03 a.m. ET and as of 7:00 p.m. ET, MessageLabs has stopped over 170,000 copies of the virus, while providing complete protection for MessageLabs' 8,000 business customers worldwide. The email containing the first copy was sent from Russia.

"This is certainly the first major virus outbreak of 2004," said Mark Sunner, Chief Technology Officer at MessageLabs. "Not only is it causing major nuisance damage through the sheer volume of email it's generating but it may also leave a backdoor wide open for hackers to take control of the machine and misappropriate passwords, credit-card details or for some other nefarious purpose."
And here are the details from Symantec in the ComputerWorld article:
According to Symantec, the worm also installs a "key logger" that can capture anything that is entered, including passwords and credit card numbers, and will start sending requests for data to SCO's Web site.
It appears somebody needs to apologize to somebody for leaping to ugly conclusions about the Linux community.

Update: Also today SCO issued another press release, offering money for clues leading to the arrest and conviction of the evildoer who wrote MyDoom and sent it SCO's way. $250,000.

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