decoration decoration
Stories

GROKLAW
When you want to know more...
decoration
For layout only
Home
Archives
Site Map
Search
About Groklaw
Awards
Legal Research
Timelines
ApplevSamsung
ApplevSamsung p.2
ArchiveExplorer
Autozone
Bilski
Cases
Cast: Lawyers
Comes v. MS
Contracts/Documents
Courts
DRM
Gordon v MS
GPL
Grokdoc
HTML How To
IPI v RH
IV v. Google
Legal Docs
Lodsys
MS Litigations
MSvB&N
News Picks
Novell v. MS
Novell-MS Deal
ODF/OOXML
OOXML Appeals
OraclevGoogle
Patents
ProjectMonterey
Psystar
Quote Database
Red Hat v SCO
Salus Book
SCEA v Hotz
SCO Appeals
SCO Bankruptcy
SCO Financials
SCO Overview
SCO v IBM
SCO v Novell
SCO:Soup2Nuts
SCOsource
Sean Daly
Software Patents
Switch to Linux
Transcripts
Unix Books
Your contributions keep Groklaw going.
To donate to Groklaw 2.0:

Groklaw Gear

Click here to send an email to the editor of this weblog.


To read comments to this article, go here
SCO: It's IBM's Fault We're So Slow with Discovery
Wednesday, October 22 2003 @ 03:04 PM EDT

Here you are. Plaintiff's Substitute Motion for Enlargement of Time to Respond to Defendant IBM's Motion to Compel Discovery. In it, SCO explains to Judge Kimball why it should get more time to answer IBM's Motion to Compel. It's here as a pdf and below is a text version.

Everything they say is to buttress their claim that they need more time. They say it isn't just about lines of code; it's about methods, ways of doing things, and from their standpoint it's about IBM violating a license agreement. They need time to properly frame their response. It's not that they are stalling. It's just that IBM has phrased things so contentiously, they need to answer in detail. Oh, if only it were as simple as just turning over some documents!

The trade secrets issue is not the main thrust of their case, despite IBM trying to mischaracterize it that way, they add. And they admit they goofed when they brought up the local Utah rule, implying IBM didn't give them proper notice of what they were after. They were working from an incomplete fax, they claim, but happily they have since found IBM's addendum and "SCO apologizes to this Court for filing a motion deficient in that manner." They acknowledge they did have notice.

They tell the judge the case is so complex that just turning over the code IBM is demanding wouldn't tell the complete story and that is why they need more time. Translation: we don't want to turn over the code this exact minute. And when we do, don't expect it to be convincing.

It looks to me like they are quite worried about IBM being too effective in telling the judge why SCO shouldn't get more time to respond to IBM's Motion to Compel, and it also sounds like they are trying to spin the ball just right, because they know they have to hand over the code, and we all know how effective that will be. Not. So here they are preparing the judge, and the world, by saying that it isn't central to their case anyhow.

It all comes across as a kid telling the teacher why he didn't do his homework. How convincing do you find this, for example?:

"The drafters of the first Motion for Enlargement worked largely from faxed documents that were incomplete and did not contain the Addendum to IBM's Motion to Compel. Since the filing of the original motion, the contents of the Addendum were discovered."

Your dog ate your homework. They frame it all in a way that the judge won't be totally able to ignore, though because they are saying, unless they have more time, the judge won't understand the issues properly.

This is just my impression of the document. Here it is in full so you can form your own:

Plaintiff's Substitute Motion for Enlargement of Time to Respond to Defendant IBM's Motion to Compel Discovery

October 20, 2003

Plaintiff/Counterclaim Defendant, The SCO Group, Inc. ("SCO"), through its undersigned counsel, pursuant to Rule 6(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and applicable Local Rules, respectfully submits this Substitute Motion for Enlargement of Time to Respond to IBM's Motion to Compel Discovery. [1]

The issue underlying IBM's Motion to Compel is not really a dispute about one party's intransigence in turning over documents in its possession. Such motions are relatively straightforward. Rather, as SCO will amplify in its response, IBM has framed the facts underlying the motion in such a tendentious way that it leaves SCO little choice but to address numerous contentions outside the proper scope of a discovery matter.

Specifically, IBM's Motion to Compel attempts to reframe the entire subject matter of SCO's dispute with IBM as the misuse of trade secrets. [2] Yet, SCO's amended complaint has six counts. The first three constitute the core of the complaint, and are for breach of the licensing agreements to which SCO is a successor in interest. The remaining counts -- including Count VI for misappropriation of trade secrets under Utah Code Ann. 13-24-1 et seq. -- flow from this transgression and are ancillary to the breach of the agreements. Thus, contrary to IBM's mischaracterization, trade secret misappropriation in this case involves merely one count that recasts one aspect of the injuries caused by IBM's breach. These injuries would exist even in the absence of any trade secret misappropriation.

IBM's frustrations, expressed in its Motion to Compel, seem to flow from its unwillingness to admit that SCO's claims about trade secret misappropriation extend beyond merely lines of source code and computer files to methods, that is, to ways of doing things. Thus, contrary to IBM's assertion that "the only dispute here is whether SCO can meet its obligation to provide meaningful responses to the interrogatories through a general reference to the documents it has or will produce," IBM Memorandum 10, the dispute appears to be of a completely different magnitude. To properly apprise this Court of these facts and the applicable case law, SCO respectfully requests an extension of time to October 24, 2003 to respond to IBM's Motion to Compel Discovery.

No prejudice will come to IBM by the granting of this Motion; nevertheless, IBM has opposed it.

Respectfully submitted,

DATED this 20th day of October, 2003.

[1] The drafters of the first Motion for Enlargement worked largely from faxed documents that were incomplete and did not contain the Addendum to IBM's Motion to Compel. Since the filing of the original motion, the contents of the Addendum were discovered. The Addendum does provide the requisite notice as to IBM's objections to SCO's responses. SCO apologizes to this Court for filing a motion deficient in that manner. This substitute motion again addresses the need for a brief enlargement of time without reference to the procedural requirement imposed by DUCivR 37-1(b).

[2] For example, IBM has claimed that "[t]he gravamen of SCO's complaint is that IBM misappropriated or misused alleged trade secrets," IBM Memorandum 2; IBM likewise implies that trade secrets are the fundamental issue at stake when it claims that "[i]nterpreting SCO's discovery requests absent identification of the trade secrets at issue has, however, proven very difficult." IBM Memorandum 18.





  View Printable Version


Groklaw © Copyright 2003-2013 Pamela Jones.
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.
Comments are owned by the individual posters.

PJ's articles are licensed under a Creative Commons License. ( Details )