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To read comments to this article, go here
If We Send You an Invoice, Then Will You Pay Us?
Monday, August 11 2003 @ 02:58 AM EDT

Now SCO says it will send out invoices to the 1500 companies that got the earlier warning from them, and maybe you too, in the next weeks or months. What? You mean you aren't in a hurry to stand before a judge? Expected response from one and all: yawn. Here's the article:
SCO Group Inc is preparing to invoice customers running or developing with Linux, while broadening its copyright net to include manufacturers of embedded systems. . . .

Invoices will be dispatched in the "next weeks or months" a company spokesperson confirmed.

Those being billed will include 1,500 end-users who were earlier this year informed by SCO in writing they should seek legal advice as running Linux violated the company's copyright. Customers running Linux who were not on SCO's original mailing list will also be targeted."

Chris Sontag says you end user pirates better not wait for the legal case to be over, or you'll have to "face the consequences":
"SCO has the right to defend its copyright all the way down to the end user," said Sontag. "If necessary we will start picking end users to enforce our rights." Sontag warned that SCO had no qualms about enforcing its claimed rights anywhere in the world - including the UK.
And if that doesn't work, then they'll huff and they'll puff and they'll blow your house down.

With FUD galore.



Update: Speaking of FUD, SCO released a press release about an unnamed licensee:

The SCO Group Announces Signing of Intellectual Property Compliance License for SCO UNIX Rights
Fortune 500 Licensee Acquires SCO UNIX License for Concurrent Run-Time Use of Linux

LINDON, Utah, Aug 11, 2003 -- The SCO® Group (SCO)(Nasdaq: SCOX) today announced the signing of its first Intellectual Property Compliance License for SCO UNIX® Rights. This announcement comes less than a week after the commencement of the SCO IP License for Linux program. Terms of the deal and the Fortune 500 company name were not disclosed based on confidentiality provisions of the agreement, but a license was purchased for each of the Linux servers running their business.

"We've had more than 300 companies in the first four business days of this program contact SCO to inquire about SCO's Intellectual Property License for Linux," said Chris Sontag, senior vice president and general manager, SCOsource, SCO's software licensing division. "This Fortune 500 company recognizes the importance of paying for SCO's intellectual property that is found in Linux and can now run Linux in their environment under a legitimate license from SCO. We anticipate this being the first of many licensees that will properly compensate SCO for our intellectual property. After having initiated the program last week, we are very pleased with the licensing interest to date."

For more information on the SCO Intellectual Property License for Linux, contact SCO by calling (800) 726-8649 or visit the SCO Web site at http://www.sco.com/scosource/linuxlicense.html.


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