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To read comments to this article, go here
SEC Registration Statement for SCO last February
Sunday, May 25 2003 @ 10:46 PM EDT

SCO's SEC Registration Statement for February 2003 is interesting:
If the market for our Linux products does not grow as we anticipate or if the UNIX market continues to contract, we may not be able to grow our business.

Our revenue from the sale of UNIX based products has declined since we acquired these operations from Tarantella. This decrease in revenue has been attributable to the worldwide economic slowdown as well as from competitive pressures from alternative operating systems. Sales of Linux based products are dependent on the development of certifiable, reliable products for business and the acceptance and adoption of Linux based operating systems by businesses. If the demand for UNIX based products continues to decline, or if such demand is not replaced by new demand for Linux-based products, we may not be able to successfully implement our business plan.

We operate in a highly competitive market and face significant competition from a variety of current and potential sources, including Red Hat and Sun Microsystems; many of our current and potential competitors have greater financial and technical resources than we do; thus, we may fail to compete effectively.

Our principal competitors in the Linux market include Red Hat, Sun and SuSe. In addition, due to the open source nature of Linux, anyone can freely download Linux and many Linux applications and modify and re-distribute them with few restrictions. For example, solution providers upon whom we depend for the distribution of our products could instead create their own Linux solutions to provide to their customers. Also, established companies and other institutions could produce competing versions of Linux software.




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