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Sept. 1999 Press Release Quotes SCO VP on Project Monterey, AIX on POWER
Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:17 PM EDT

Now that the revisionists of computer history are claiming that IBM was not contractually allowed to run AIX on POWER, I thought it would be fun to present you with a 1999 press release, put out jointly by IBM , Intel, SCO and Sequent, which quotes a SCO marketing VP mentioning AIX running on POWER, and it sounds like he was thrilled about it:

"Getting the Monterey/64 operating system up and running on real silicon enables us to get to the next level of engagement with our common ISVs and OEMs," said Mike Orr, senior vp worldwide marketing, SCO. "We will now see an acceleration in 64-bit hardware design and development, and more ISVs actively porting to UnixWare 7 on IA/32 platforms and AIX on POWER platforms as they prepare for the release of Monterey/64."

Not only that, but get a load of this description of their objective in doing Project Monterey:

The objective of the Project Monterey initiative is to establish a volume, enterprise-class, UNIX product line that runs across Intel IA-32 and IA-64 processors and IBM's POWER processors in systems that range from departmental to large data center servers.

So, there you have it, ladies and gentlemen of the jury. Can SCO's tortured contract interpretations stand in the face of this little bit of honest history? I wish to thank Wayback for making this moment possible.

Still, because of the ephemeral nature of the Internet, I will now reproduce the entire press release, just in case it disappears.

******************************

Monterey/64 becomes the first UNIX Operating System to run on Intel's Merced Chip

September 1999

  Dupont, Washington...September 16, 1999 -- IBM , Intel, SCO and Sequent today announced they achieved a major development milestone in getting the Monterey for IA-64 version of the UNIX operating system (code name Monterey/64) up and running on Intel Merced hardware in less than 24 hours. Monterey/64 is the first commercial UNIX operating system to run on Merced hardware. Today's announcement underscores the commitment of the Monterey participants to establish Monterey/64 as the leading volume, commercial, enterprise-class UNIX operating system for the Intel IA-64 microprocessor and IBM POWER processor architectures.

"Getting Monterey/64 up and running on Intel hardware in less than a day is an extraordinary achievement," said Rajiv Samant, general manager, UNIX brand, IBM Corporation. "With this milestone, we have overtaken Sun, HP and others in the industry. When you combine this achievement with the growing support from systems and software companies, it is clear that we are on the path of making Monterey the lead UNIX operating system."

"Monterey/64 is the leading enterprise UNIX operating environment for customers and independent software developers," said Mike Fister, general manager, enterprise server group, Intel Corporation. "This significant development milestone shows that Monterey/64 has completed several significant steps and is on a roll to be available with Merced processor systems when Merced ships next year."

"Getting the Monterey/64 operating system up and running on real silicon enables us to get to the next level of engagement with our common ISVs and OEMs," said Mike Orr, senior vp worldwide marketing, SCO. "We will now see an acceleration in 64-bit hardware design and development, and more ISVs actively porting to UnixWare 7 on IA/32 platforms and AIX on POWER platforms as they prepare for the release of Monterey/64."

"At the announcement of the Project Monterey initiative, we committed to delivering a product ready for Intel's Merced launch," said Jeff Pancottine, vice president global marketing, Sequent. "This latest milestone demonstrates that we are positioned not only to ship systems at the launch of Merced, but also to achieve leadership time to market."

Last month, IBM, SCO and Sequent successfully demonstrated the Apache Webserver on Monterey/64 on the Intel Merced simulator at the Intel Developer's Forum in Palm Springs, Calif. The port of Apache Webserver to Monterey/64 was accomplished in a day through a simple compile-and-go and proves the migration of applications to Monterey/64 will be very straightforward.

Industry momentum for Project Monterey continues to grow at a rapid pace, with many leading hardware companies on board, including Acer, Bull, Compaq, CETIA ( a subsidiary of Thomson-CF), IBM Netfinity servers, ICL, Sequent, Unisys and most recently, Samsung Electronics. Project Monterey also continues to add new independent software developers and providers. Cygnus Solutions, a leader in open-source software, this week announced an agreement with IBM to provide Cygnus GNUPro and Code Fusion software development tools, optimized for the AIX operating system and Project Monterey, on the IA-64 platform.

Project Monterey Background

Announced last October, Project Monterey is a major UNIX operating system initiative led by IBM, SCO, Sequent, Intel, and accepted by leading OEMs, including Compaq. As part of this initiative, a volume, shrink-wrapped UNIX operating system is being developed for Intel's IA-64 processors using technologies from the IBM AIX operating system, SCO UnixWare operating system and Sequent's enterprise technologies. OEMs who already have announced their support for Project Monterey include Acer, Bull, Compaq, CETIA ( a subsidiary of Thomson-CF), IBM Netfinity servers, ICL, Unisys and most recently, Samsung Electronics.

Leading software companies have announced their support for the UNIX software. The objective of the Project Monterey initiative is to establish a volume, enterprise-class, UNIX product line that runs across Intel IA-32 and IA-64 processors and IBM's POWER processors in systems that range from departmental to large data center servers.

Other leading ISVs that have announced support for Project Monterey are Baan, BEA Systems, Compuware, Cygnus Solutions, Data Pro Accounting Software, Informix, Merant Micro Focus, Netscape Communications Corporation, Novell, PeopleSoft, Pick Systems, Progress Software, Rational, Real World, Risk Management Technology, Software AG, SAS Institute, TakeFive, Tivoli, Viador, as well as BMC Software, daly.commerce, Facet, Geac SmartEnterprise Solutions, ISOCOR, J.D. Edwards, Marcam Solutions, Parasoft, Sanchez, Sapiens International N.V., Sendmail and TIBCO.

###

Editor's Note: IBM news releases and fact sheets are available on the World Wide Web at http://www.ibm.com.
Additional information on IBM and Project Monterey can be found at http://www.ibm.com/servers/monterey.
SCO news releases are available at www.sco.com
AIX and Netfinity are trademarks of IBM Corporation.
SCO and UnixWare are registered trademarks of The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
All others are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.


  


Sept. 1999 Press Release Quotes SCO VP on Project Monterey, AIX on POWER | 96 comments | Create New Account
Comments belong to whoever posts them. Please notify us of inappropriate comments.
Political Comments Here
Authored by: Anonymous on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:38 PM EDT
This will make deleting them ASAP easier.

[ Reply to This | # ]

OT here, please
Authored by: overshoot on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:40 PM EDT
Make them clickable HTML if you would.

[ Reply to This | # ]

Sept. 1999 Press Release Quotes SCO VP on Project Monterey, AIX on POWER
Authored by: Nick_UK on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:48 PM EDT
Still, because of the ephemeral nature of the Internet, I will now reproduce the entire press release, just in case it disappear.

:-D Quote of the week... excellent :-D

Nick

[ Reply to This | # ]

Corrections.
Authored by: DBLR on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:52 PM EDT
Please place corrections here so PJ may correct them.


Charles

---

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is
a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."
Benjamin Franklin.

[ Reply to This | # ]

The Objective of Project Monterey
Authored by: rsteinmetz70112 on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 01:56 PM EDT
"The objective of the Project Monterey initiative is to establish a volume,
enterprise-class, UNIX product line that runs across Intel IA-32 and IA-64
processors and IBM's POWER processors in systems that range from departmental to
large data center servers."

---
Rsteinmetz

"I could be wrong now, but I don't think so."
Randy Newman - The Title Theme from Monk

[ Reply to This | # ]

IBM has it available still
Authored by: Burger on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 03:00 PM EDT
IBM has it available as well as a press release - dated the day after

Go to www.ibm.com and search on monterey - first hit

(couldn't make a link work)
burger

[ Reply to This | # ]

Sept. 1999 Press Release Quotes SCO VP on Project Monterey, AIX on POWER
Authored by: belzecue on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 03:08 PM EDT
"Still, because of the ephemeral nature of the Internet, I will now
reproduce the entire press release, just in case it disappears."

You can still grab it from 8 or so sites. Just Google on

"becomes the first UNIX Operating System to run on Intel's Merced
Chip" (include double quotes)

Interesting to see the 'SCO - Newsroom' link in the results, but it's no longer
working (artemis.sco.com). You can, however, visit the Google cache of the
page. Very interesting. I'll attach the page as a child, for possible future
reference...

[ Reply to This | # ]

Ransom Love
Authored by: Anonymous on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 03:32 PM EDT
Here's an article from eWeek with Ransom Love discussing UNIX and Project
Monterey.

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1492264,00.asp

[ Reply to This | # ]

Sept. 1999 Press Release Quotes SCO VP on Project Monterey, AIX on POWER
Authored by: Anonymous on Monday, April 04 2005 @ 04:14 PM EDT
AIX v1 was something that IBM remarketed in round about 1986, to run on Intel
80x86 processors, from a company which (I think) is now part of HP. Sort-of
alongside OS/2.
AIX v2 was something written by IBM to operate the now-defunct RTPC family of
processors (an early IBM RISC design), round about 1988.
AIX v3 was the first version of what we now think of AIX, written by IBM, to run
on POWER processors round about 1990.
POWER2, POWERPC, POWER3, POWER4, POWER5, and POWER6 are successors to POWER ...
mostly running the same instruction set, with minor tweaks in things like how
you do divisions ... and AIXv4 and AIXv5 are successors to AIXv3, for things
like multiprocessor capability and 64-bit integers

[ Reply to This | # ]

Linux Beat Monterey to IA-64
Authored by: chris_bloke on Tuesday, April 05 2005 @ 01:29 AM EDT
Thing is that's September, whilst in August 1999 HP already had the Linux kernel running in native 64-bit mode on IA-64 according to this technical report from HP, (direct link to PDF here).

There is also a paper (PDF here) & slides (PDF here) that David Mosberger from HP presented at Linux Expo '99 documenting their work that includes a very interesting timeline that shows that they first got the kernel to successfully boot and run Hello World on the 20th January 1999, and they had that with CERNs glibc for IA64 running by the 9th April 1999.

So, if Linux was running on IA-64 *before* Monterey, could we claim that they copied from Linux using SCO's bent logic ? ;-)

Chris

[ Reply to This | # ]

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